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Liberal Studies

For the 21st Century


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Liberal Studies Course Search

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This accounting internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real-world experience in the accounting field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director. S/U grade only.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

The Hispanic Marketing course provides students the opportunity to identify and embrace the differences and find the similarities at the same time by acquiring knowledge on (1) cultural theories associated with Hispanic values, artifacts, and traditions; (2) the acculturation processes; (3) socialization; (4) importance of diversity and culture as effective communication tools; and (5) the impact of religion, family formation, gender and sexual orientation, social mobility, and age groups on consumer behavior and media habits. This course prepares undergraduate students to become educated decision makers and consumers of information regarding U.S. Hispanic marketing communication issues.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course is the second of a two course sequence. This course focuses on campaign execution. The advertising team course is an application-based class, which provides students with the opportunity to develop a complete Integrated Marketing Communication campaign plan as part of the National Student Advertising Competition sponsored by the American Advertising Federation. The class is set up as hierarchy based advertising agency with some students in leadership positions and others working in departments that are managed by student directors.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course explores the coordination of advertising and marketing research, planning, creative strategy, and selection of media and production activities leading to the development of advertising campaigns.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course integrates African authors, pre- and post-Apartheid, to demonstrate the problems of living in a diverse world. It fosters awareness and acceptance of people different from students through the study of the African-American culture, and stimulates an appreciation and respect for people of all cultures.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

An interdisciplinary examination of African-­American culture. Students submit “reaction” papers in which they record and assess their response to issues and experiences. Unannounced quizzes, assigned readings, a midterm, and a final examination.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

A comparative, historical, and multi­disciplinary analysis of racism and other forms of oppression (e.g., sexism), with special emphasis upon their belief, value systems, and institutional components and how these are expressed in the modern U.S. context. Performance on unannounced quizzes, assigned readings, a midterm, and a final examination are used to determine grades.

Course Area: History
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course introduces students to the history of British North America and the United States through the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Course Area: History
Designations: Statewide Core

This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.

Course Area: History
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines, both chronologically and thematically, the experience of African Americans in the United States and their role in shaping the nation's history. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

Developed by:
Course Area: History
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course surveys American-Indian relations with the people and the government of the United States, beginning in the 1760s and continuing to the present. Topics cover the Indians' diplomatic and military struggles, as well as to the Indian perspective on familiar historical events such as the Civil War, the New Deal, and the 1960s.

Developed by: Maxine Jones
Course Area: History
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Black Women in America examines (chronologically and thematically) the unique experience of the African American woman in the United States and the role they have played in shaping this nation's history. Particular attention is paid to the double burden that black women have experienced because of their race and gender. This course will not count as credit toward the history major.

Course Area: History
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

The history of immigration to the United States. Includes the evolution of ethnic cultures and the role of race in adjustment, and related conflicts from colonial times to the present. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

Course Area: History
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course explores the history of the Seminoles and other Southeastern Native Americans in the territory that is now known as the American South. The course covers the pre-contact era to the present with an emphasis on tribal perspectives.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Major figures and works in the American literary tradition, from colonial era through romanticism and the decade following the Civil War. Typically includes Franklin, Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson. Midterm and final will consist of short answer and essay questions. One or two analytical essays outside of class.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

A survey of African­American poetry, fiction, and prose from the mid­eighteenth century to the present in the context of African­American social and intellectual history. Readings include the slave narrative, abolitionist oratory, writers in the Harlem Renaissance, and the Black Aesthetic Movement of the sixties and seventies. Typically includes Douglass, Chesnutt, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Morrison, and Walker.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Major figures and works in the American literary tradition from the post­Civil War realists and the local colorists through the literary naturalists and more contemporary writers. Typically includes Twain, James, Crane, Eliot, Hemingway, Frost, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Baldwin, Morrison, and O’Connor.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines selected works of major American writers.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Introduction to landmark Latino/Latina works written in English.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Introduction to cross-­cultural literary traditions looking at historical rationales and interconnections and differences among communities. Tests and critical papers will be required.

Developed by: Maxine Montgomery
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), Upper Division Writing Competency

The African-American Literary Tradition is an upper-level course that offers an intensive focus on selected works by United States authors of African descent. Our readings will move beyond a historical survey of the black literate tradition to include a close interrogation of tropes of migration, exile, and home, the predominant concerns defining the African-American Literary Tradition. Central to our discussion are issues such as cultural hybridity or double-consciousness, border-crossing, language use, memory, and history. Ultimately, our readings will allow a scholarly consideration of the ways in which black writers utilize language creatively, if not subversively, in an attempt to come to terms with the condition of being at once both at home and in exile.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), Statewide Core

Anthropology is a holistic discipline that includes both a cultural and a biological understanding of human nature. It examines and records human cultural expression in all its diversity of time and place. It strives to identify the fundamental features of human nature which make cultural diversity both possible and inevitable. This course will examine what it means to be human with the holistic perspective and the comparative methodology that make anthropology distinctive.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course is an introduction to modern anthropological archaeology. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary scientific approaches employed in contemporary archaeological research and provides students with an overview of the origins and evolution of human social and economic systems.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This is a lab course is to be taken simultaneously with ANT 2100, Introduction to Archaeology. The course is designed specifically for first- and second-year undergraduates with no experience in anthropology or archaeology. ANT2100L will introduce students to the various multi-disciplinary techniques carried out in modern archaeological science. Students will receive hands-on training in a variety of different data recovery, cataloguing, and analytical procedures commonly employed in modern archaeological studies. The students will get an opportunity to record and analyze artifacts to model prehistoric environments and lifeways. In addition, they will learn basic techniques of paleobotanical and zooarchaeological analysis, and receive instruction on geophysical techniques (remote sensing) and Geographic Information Systems.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course is an examination of human sexuality from an evolutionary perspective. Some of the topics covered include sexual selection, mating systems, mate preferences, and sexual orientation.

Developed by: Amy Kowal
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course introduces the origin and development of human lifeways with emphasis on non-Western societies. A comparative perspective is used to examine language, social organization, religion, values, and technology. Attention is also given to contemporary world problems.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course examines the variety of ways the childhood is experienced in cultures around the world. It allows students without a background in anthropology to develop an appreciation for the nature of culture, the nature of childhood and the pivotal role of childhood in maintaining cultural continuity and influencing cultural evolution. Examination of the scientific evidence for the nature of children will alternate with cinematic dramatization and discussion of relevant readings.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course introduces theory and principles of genetically based evolution. It reviews fossil evidence for human evolution and competing ideas about the specific pathways to modern humans. It emphasizes the genetic unity of humankind and the universal features that underlie individual and cultural diversity.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This 1-credit optional co-requisite laboratory course to ANT2511 “Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Prehistory” provides students with hands-on exercises that are designed to enhance their grasp of fundamental techniques and principles that form the basis for studying physical anthropology and prehistory. Exercises focus on the nature and dating of the archaeological record, techniques for assessing and measuring skeletal material, heredity and evolutionary processes, comparative anatomy of primates, and criteria for recognizing and interpreting fossil australopithecines and Homo. This laboratory provides an opportunity for students to handle and measure artifacts, skeletal material, and fossil hominin casts which will enable them to gain insight into the scientific procedures that are used to interpret the nature and causes of human evolution.

Developed by: Amy Kowal
Course Area: History
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course provides a survey of the development of prehistoric societies around the world. We begin by assessing the archaeological methods and techniques that are used to secure evidence of prehistoric societies and how that evidence may be interpreted. We consider the question of human origins and how we have come to understand that our past on this planet stretches back several million years. After a brief consideration of the paleoanthropological evidence of our earliest ancestors, the course focuses on the development of culture among human groups as a prelude to understanding regional diversity. We examine the first evidence of culture then focus on hunting and gathering societies. We next consider the development of agriculture and the rise of complex societies. We survey the development of state societies and early empires in a variety of global regions. We study the impact of European exploration and colonization on the indigenous peoples of the Americas. The course concludes with a discussion of cultural resources management issues relative to archaeological and historical cultural resources, archaeological ethics, and the value of heritage preservation.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is a survey of the world's cultures by major geographic regions. The purpose is to familiarize the student with range and variety of the human condition and at the same time instill in the student a respect and admiration for humankind. Lectures, readings, and visual materials are utilized.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course examines the concept of race from the perspectives of biological and cultural anthropology, beginning with the study of modern human biological variation and its clinical distribution. This biological patterning is then contrasted with the social categories of race. The final section of the course covers the history of the concept of race, the ways humans culturally construct divisions in different societies, and the continued effectsof racial concepts on science and modern cultures.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is an introduction to and examination of human language, its relation to perception and cognition, and its role in social interaction. This includes verbal as well as nonverbal communication modes, their variety and complexity, the evolution of language, and language change.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), Upper Division Writing Competency

The focus of this course is to provide a basic understanding of the current anthropological issues of religion within cultures around the world. The principles of cultural anthropology theory are emphasized and how they apply to the different peoples, genders, political systems, and the human experience. It enables students to consider religion’s major role in contemporary world affairs. Themes that are addressed include religion’s relation with society, environment, supernatural beings, specialists, rituals, altered states, sickness and health, religious evolution and revitalization movements. There is an emphasis on indigenous religious experience, as well as an examination of world religions. This course has a prerequisite of ANT2410 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course introduces students to Paleopathology. Bone, Bodies, and Disease shows how the latest scientific and archaeological techniques can be used to identify the common illnesses and injuries that humans suffered in antiquity. In order to give a vivid picture of ancient disease and trauma, results of the latest scientific research that incorporate information gathered from documents are presented. This comprehensive approach to the subject throws fresh light on the health of our ancestors and on the conditions in which they lived, and it gives us an intriguing insight into the ways in which they coped with the pain and discomfort of their existence.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This seminar style course introduces students to arts administration by exploring basic administration and management principles as they relate to the visual and performing arts. The course also features off-campus site visits to local arts and culture organizations and applied hands-on interactions.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Statewide Core

This is a course about how to look systematically—visual appreciation, if you like—but it is also a course about how to see. To do this we will look different art forms, from traditional “high art” like painting, sculpture, and architecture to “popular” art such as advertisements, online imagery, and graffiti art. We will also discuss ephemeral (i.e., temporary) art and art forms that were never meant to hang in a museum. Along the way we will explore our local museums and other places where we interact with the visual production of our society. This course invites you to build on the few examples we can give in this course to think about the extremely complex visual lives you all lead.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course introduces students to the history of Western art from the prehistoric period to the 14th century. Through classroom lectures and discussions, readings, and written assignments, all participants will consider the meaning and function of art objects within the social, religious, political, and technological contexts surrounding them. Rigorous writing assignments develop students’ critical and analytical skills.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course introduces students to the history of Western art from the early Renaissance through the modern period. Through classroom lectures and discussions, readings, and written assignments, all participants will consider the meaning and function of art objects within the social, religious, political, and technological contexts surrounding them. Rigorous writing assignments develop students’ critical and analytical skills.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course investigates the meaning and the role of archaeology in shaping our past and present lives. In particular, we will ask questions about the purpose, the means, and the agencies behind the excavation process, and thus touch upon the theoretical underpinnings of archaeology as a science. The course is a comprehensive survey that begins with the basics of human evolution and covers the history and material culture of key ancient civilizations, not least those that populated the Mesopotamian and Mediterranean basins.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course introduces students to computer-based research, writing, and presentation tools essential in art history. It fulfills the university's computer literacy requirement for undergraduates, with a focus on computer applications that are particularly useful in the field of art history. The course is open to all majors and required for art history majors.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

A survey of Greek art from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period and important archaeological discoveries in Greek lands.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

A study of Etruscan, early Italian, and Roman art and archaeology crucial in the formation of the Western humanistic tradition. A short paper is required. Essay and objective tests.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course surveys the history of African art, covering numerous regions of the vast continent. We will examine artistic expressions and visual traditions in the Sahara; along the Nile, Congo, and Niger rivers; in the Central and Western Sudan; the Atlantic Forests; the Cameroon grasslands; and eastern and southern Africa, among others. Based on the undocumented nature of so much African history, the course does not follow a chronological model, but rather adopts a regional approach. We will consider the development of known traditions and their legacy in modern and contemporary art and architecture, where possible. The course covers a range of visual and material expressions, including painting, sculpture, architecture, costuming, ritual implements, cultural landscapes, and ephemera.

Developed by: Lynn Jones
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course surveys the history of Islamic art, covering numerous cultures on several continents. We will examine the development of artistic expressions and visual traditions in Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iran, Iraq, Turkey, and Spain. The course does not follow a chronological model, but rather adopts a regional and thematic approach. We will study the development of known traditions and their legacy in modern and contemporary art and architecture. The course covers a range of visual and material expressions, including painting, sculpture, architecture, textiles, cultural landscapes, and ephemera.

Developed by: Paul Niell
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course surveys the art, architecture, and visual culture of Spain's overseas colonies during the period of early exploration and Austrian Hapsburg rule in Spain (1506–1700). It examines a wide array of visual expressions, including painting, sculpture, architecture, urban space, prints, ephemera, ceramics, furniture, and clothing. In the course of this survey, the relationship between art and such issues as colonialism, race, gender, and social hierarchy are considered.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course surveys the art, architecture, and visual culture of Spain's overseas colonies during the period of Bourbon imperial rule (1700-1821/1898). It examines a wide array of visual expressions, including painting, sculpture, architecture, urban space, prints, ephemera, ceramics, furniture, and clothing. In the course of this survey, the relationship between art and such issues as colonialism, race, gender, and social hierarchy are considered.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

This course is an undergraduate seminar in art history with changing topics.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course engages the visual cultures of the African Diaspora with geographic attention to the contemporary nations of Cuba, Haiti, Brazil, Puerto Rico, the Bahamas, and Jamaica. After background on the visual cultures of West Africa, particularly those of Yoruba origin, we discuss the transformative impact of Atlantic World slavery and colonial institutions on African traditions. We consider the material and visual landscapes of new African ethnic formations in the Americas in relation to slavery, religious institutions, such as confraternities, ritual life, and the formation of symbolic economies. We then investigate how various religious traditions and their attendant visual cultures were remade in the post-slavery era.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course offers an introduction to the theory and practice of digital imaging.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This class introduces students to the myriad ways that artists create contemporary art. This intuitively designed course is taught through a series of multi-media lectures and interactive discussions and culminates with a student-designed virtual curatorial project. The small class size facilitates meaningful peer interactions and allow for active instructor feedback. Offered to all non-art majors.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

Graduating students will have the opportunity to use knowledge and skills learned earlier in their studies and apply these toward a summative exhibition. We will also discuss the various ways others who have earned a BA in studio art have found to apply their experiences toward their future endeavors. To facilitate this, we will be bringing in guests to talk about a full range of opportunities and resources, as well as exploring some basic tools for sustaining a life in the arts post-graduation.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course facilitates internships in a variety of work situations. Must be approved by department chair. Preference given to seniors.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course is the capstone course for all BFA students in the Department of Art. Students develop and execute a capstone thesis project to be exhibited publicly. Additionally, students organize an artist's talk to be delivered to an audience.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: History
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This introductory course is on Middle Eastern history and culture with a considerable emphasis on the impact of religion: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The primary emphasis of the course is to understand the historical and cultural background of the major problems facing the Middle East today. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

Course Area: History
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is an introduction to political, cultural, and economic Asian history from antiquity to the present. It places special emphasis not only on the study of important Asian kings and leaders but also on the various religions which originated in Asia.

Developed by: Will Hanley
Course Area: History
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

This seminar surveys regional studies methodology by introducing a dozen examples of a domain of Middle Eastern studies (for example, cities, biographies, countries, sects, dialects), using a variety of lecturers and approaches. Students will a) become familiar with the particular characters of dozen instances of a Middle Eastern domain, in this way learning something of the diversity of the region, b) encounter a variety of approaches to the study of the region, and c) develop deep knowledge of one instance, which they will study over the course of the semester.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

The course investigates the history of the US and Modern East Asia from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, covering political interactions and cultural encounters between Americans and Japanese, Koreans, and Chinese.

Developed by: John Justl
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course acquaints students with the political, cultural, educational, and social parameters of Deaf Culture. International and United States perspectives are included.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This course provides general acquaintance with some of the facts, concepts and scientific methods of astronomy. As a liberal study course, the goal is to help you learn some basic facts of astronomy as well as gain an appreciation of astronomy as a science, the universe, and the current scientific ideas about its history and its future.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This course, which consists of outdoor and indoor labs, provides a hands-on introduction to astronomy as an observational science. In the outdoor labs you will learn how to make observations and measurements of planetary, stellar and galactic objects using either your unaided eyes, binoculars or a telescope. The indoor labs will acquaint you with the telescope, the coordinate system used to locate astronomical objects on the sky, the motion of objects in the sky and other basic concepts of astronomy.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

This course offers an introduction to experimental methodology, data analysis and interpretation, calibration techniques, scientific model validation, as well as data presentation and communication of results. The laboratory experiments have astrophysical relevance.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

General Biochemistry Lab is the laboratory course associated with the General Biochemistry lecture series (BCH4053 and BCH4054). It is designed to teach students fundamental laboratory approaches and techniques in protein biochemistry, molecular biology, and DNA manipulation. These techniques form the foundation for many of the experiments of a contemporary biochemical research laboratory. This course will cover many techniques including protein purification, quantification, and analysis; DNA manipulation and molecular cloning; and immunobiochemistry.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This course consists of four units of contemporary biology topics, taught by biology professors/researchers who specialize in the subject matter. Topics vary each semester. The course emphasizes the development of science proficiency by teaching students to understand, use, and interpret scientific explanations of the natural world and apply this knowledge to social, environmental, political or wellness issues.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This course will emphasize the development of multiple aspects of science proficiency for all students: knowing, using, and interpreting scientific explanations of the natural world; generating and evaluating scientific evidence and explanations; understanding the nature and development of scientific knowledge; and participating productively in the practices and discourses of science. Specifically, this course includes multiple investigations of the core concepts in biology that engage students in the practices of scientific inquiry. Biological systems will be analyzed through experimentation, dissection, observation, and modeling.

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.

Developed by: Scott Steppan
Course Area: Natural Science

This class will explore Darwin’s world and demonstrate why this statement is even more apt today. The foundation for all of modern biology is evolution, and evolutionary thought stands out from other important scientific principles by the way in which it transformed how science and the society in general view the natural world. This class will trace the origins of biological thought from the explosion of discoveries about biological diversity arising from the Age of Exploration by northern European countries, especially the UK, the early development of natural history as a field and specifically of natural history museums as a repository of those discoveries, and how these museums and global exploration set the stage for the intellectual transformation that followed.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The intention of this course is to provide the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered will provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level: 1) Atoms and Biological Molecules, 2) Cellular Biology, 3) Biochemistry and Energy Transformation 4) Molecular Genetics and 5) Physiology. The diversity of knowledge gained in BSC 2010 will aid understanding in more advanced biology classes.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Computer Competency, Natural Science Lab

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This is the second part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. This course provides an overview of the processes underlying animal embryonic development, inheritance genetics, evolution and ecology. The diversity of knowledge gained in this course will aid understanding in more advanced biology classes.

Note: The accompanying lab BSC2011L will satisfy the Scholarship-in-Practice requirement when taken together with BSC2011.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Natural Science Lab

This course focuses on reproduction and development, transmission (Mendelian) genetics, population biology, ecology, and evolution.

Note: this satisfies the Scholarship-in-Practice requirement only if taken with BSC2011.

Developed by: Yung Su
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This course is the first of a two-semester human anatomy/physiology sequence emphasizing the cell, stimulus- response concept, and the skeletal-muscular and first half of the nervous system. Some of the information from this course will provide students with background information that will be used in anatomy and physiology II (BSC 2086).

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This course is the first of a two-semester human anatomy/physiology sequence emphasizing the cell, stimulus-response concept, and the skeletal-muscular and first half of the nervous systems.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency, Oral Communication Competency

The experimental biology course is designed to teach students about the process of biological research. Each section of the course is organized around a particular biological concept. Our focus in this course is twofold. First, we need to provide students with basic background in the topic through field work, lab work, and lectures. Second, and more important, is the development of skills in biological research through laboratory and lecture exercises as well as outside assignments, culminating in an independent research project which students will present both orally and in writing. This course meets the University’s Oral Communication Competency Requirement; developing oral communication skills is a major component of this course.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

Students in this course serve as Laboratory Assistants in BSC1005L or as Tutors in BSC2010 or BSC2011, or BSC1005. Students in BSC4945 receiving training in interactive teaching techniques and use this training to lead classroom discussions and interactive exam review sessions.

Course Area: Social Science

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of terminology, classification systems, trends, and theories of criminal justice.

Course Area: Social Science

This course offers an examination of the field of criminology, including its theories, basic assumptions, and definitions.

Developed by: Mark Feulner
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course provides students with an understanding of the impact of the media on crime, criminals, the criminal justice system, and the general public. The focus of this course is the historical impact of media and its influences on the outcomes of both routine and sensational cases within the American criminal justice system and how media reporting affects the policy making processes and the social definitions of crime.

Developed by: Banyon Pelham
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course is designed to prepare the student for the use of IT in various professions within the Criminal Justice community. This includes, the fundamentals of computing, the use of data processing, word processing, email, Computer Automated Dispatch, Records Management Systems, use of the Internet and IT Security protocols.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Social Science

This course examines the involvement of minorities, especially African-Americans, in crime and in the criminal justice system. Special attention is paid to the role of racism in theories of crime and in American law and to the treatment of minorities by the various components of the criminal justice system. May require community service hours.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

The internship will allow students to gain invaluable experience, develop professional relationships with potential employers and bridge the gap between academia and the professional world by applying their classroom knowledge and developing an awareness of the responsibilities to be encountered upon entering the field of criminology/criminal justice. As a full-time intern (CCJ 4940) you will be expected to work 40 hours per week for a criminology or criminal justice affiliated agency and complete the academic requirements of this course. Upon successful completion of the program, students earn 15 credit hours: 3 credit hours toward major requirements and 12 toward general electives. The College of Criminology and Criminal Justice requires students to complete either an internship or a minor, although students can do both.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

The internship will allow students to gain invaluable experience, develop professional relationships with potential employers and bridge the gap between academia and the professional world by applying their classroom knowledge and developing an awareness of the responsibilities to be encountered upon entering the field of criminology/criminal justice. As a part-time intern (CCJ 4942), you will be expected to work 20 hours per week for a criminology or criminal justice affiliated agency and complete the academic requirements of this course. Upon successful completion of the program, students earn 8 credit hours: 3 credit hours toward major requirements and 5 toward general electives. The College of Criminology and Criminal Justice requires students to complete either an internship or a minor, although students can do both.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course explores methods and procedures of surface mapping and subsurface sectioning including distance measurements, traverse computations and topographic mapping, and Global Positioning Systems. Use of field equipment and procedures to measure distances, elevations, angles, and perform complete surveys. Computer Aided Design (CAD) Laboratory for basic engineering drafting.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Developed by: David Gaitros
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

This course starts with a rigorous study of object oriented design techniques and an introduction to current practices in Software Engineer. By the end of the course, students will participate in a group design project putting into practice what they have learned to date. Topics include UML, Object Oriented Design, theory and practice of software engineering, ethics in Computer Science and Software Engineering, Software Engineering tools, requirements elicitation, software-requirements specification, requirements review, software development, software-development life cycle, teams, and project management.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency, Oral Communication Competency

This course covers the following topics: engineering and professional ethics; professional practice issues relevant to the design and construction of engineeing projects; project planning and scheduling; design under engineering and societal constraints; importance of licensure and continuing education; as well as oral and written communication issues. Inter- or multi-disciplinary teams prepare formal proposals addressing engineering challenges; the full design of these proposals is completed during the following semester in the CGN 4802, Senior Design Project course.

Note – To satisfy the Oral Communication Competency requirement, both CGN4800 and CGN4802 must be taken.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Oral Communication Competency

This capstone senior-level design course integrates the knowledge and skills gained in undergraduate studies in civil and environmental engineering. Completion of a team-based interdisciplinary design project covering severalsub-disciplines in civil or environmental engineering. Industry and professional participation.

Note – To satisfy the Oral Communication Competency requirement, both CGN4800 and CGN4802 must be taken.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course covers computer and digital technology skills and concepts for all majors. Topics cover file management, personal information management, Internet communications, word processing, spreadsheet, and other software skills. Students learn about digital technologies, telecommunications, the Internet and the Web, management information systems, digital media, information security, digital society, as well as ethics. Not open to students with credit in CGS2100.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficientwith microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, world wide web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course provides an in-depth study of spreadsheets utilizing a problem-solving approach. Spreadsheet-based solutions are explored for common business tasks and problems. The course presents a thorough coverage of spreadsheet functions and tools, along with a deep understanding of their purpose in a business environment. The course is ideal for students with professional interests related to business and economics, as well as for students wishing to obtain a deeper understanding of spreadsheets in general.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course covers a brief introduction to computers, C++ basics, procedural abstraction and functions, an introduction to the object-oriented paradigm, namespaces, arrays, strings and vectors, pointers, and recursion. Emphasis is on program problem-solving. May not be applied toward a computer science major.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Developed by: Yanning Wang
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

Advanced Chinese I is an upper-level language course designed to enhance the comprehensive language skills of students who have taken Chinese language courses for three years or have acquired equivalent language ability before this course. By increasing vocabulary extensively, students will raise their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills to an advanced level. At the end of the course, students will be able to develop the knowledge and skills of Chinese vocabulary, grammar and sentence patterns; discuss various topics on contemporary China in global context; read articles in Chinese at an advanced level, and compose essays in Chinese on topics concerning contemporary Chinese culture.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. The course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit not allowed for CHM 1020 after successful completion of CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Computer Competency, Natural Science Lab, Statewide Core

This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. This course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit is not allowed for CHM 1020 after successful completion of CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This laboratory emphasizes major topics from CHM 1020 relating chemistry concepts and techniques to everyday life experiences. This laboratory-based course meets two hours a week. No credit allowed after taking CHM 1045.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour. This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Computer Competency, Natural Science Lab

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, thermodynamics, gases, as well as acids and bases, chemical structures and reactivity. Safety goggles, a lab coat and a scientific calculator are required for every class. Lab meets three hours a week.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour. This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include Intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Safety goggles, a lab coat and a scientific calculator are required for every class. Lab meets three hours a week.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This course is a first general chemistry course for honors students. Topics include kinetic theory, atomic theory of matter, atomic structure and the periodic chart condensed phases, introductory chemical bonding.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, thermodynamics, gases, as well as acids and bases, chemical structures and reactivity. Safety goggles, a lab coat and a scientific calculator are required for every class. Lab meets three hours a week.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

Lecture. This course is a continuation of general chemistry for honors students. Topics include solution equilibria; acid/base chemistry; oxidation, reduction, and electrochemical cells; chemical analysis; hydrides and oxides of the elements; kinetics; advanced bonding and structure.

Course Area: Natural Science

Laboratory conference, one hour; laboratory, five hours. This laboratory is an opportunity for research-based special projects. Safety goggles and scientific calculator are required for every laboratory.

Course Area: Natural Science

CHM2047 is the one semester general chemistry course which provides a strong chemistry foundation for undergraduate students in the pre-medical school majors. The primary objective is to develop a thorough understanding of chemistry and its applications to medicine. Prerequisites: MAC1105 or better with a grade "C–" or better; And AP Chemistry Test Score of 4 or better; Or IB Chemistry Test Score of 5 or better; Or satisfactory score on placement exam. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour. This course includes topics such as electronic structure, molecular structure, intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, materials and electrochemistry.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

CHM2047L is a one semester laboratory designed for the pre-medicine and related Life Science majors. This course assumes a previous knowledge of chemistry based on your achieving high marks in your high school chemistry courses or exams. The lab explores the concepts and techniques each of you will need most as you progress through the rest of your chemistry curriculum. The lab was developed around on three key concepts: 1) the experiments should challenge the student to think independently about chemistry both in the lab setting and in the world environment, 2) the experiments should support and expand upon the material that is being covered in the classroom, and 3) the experiments should build the student’s skills in basic chemistry techniques. Pre- or Co-requisite CHM 2047.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

Organic Chemistry II laboratory is a one semester laboratory for majors in the physical and life sciences that is used to give students experience in the basic organic laboratory techniques such as extraction, distillation, recrystallization, chromatography and multi-step synthesis required for research and industrial careers in chemistry. Laboratory conference, one hour; laboratory, seven hours.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency, Natural Science Lab

This first course in analytical chemistry covers statistical analysis of analytical data, acid-base equilibria, acid-based titrations, electrochemistry, analytical seperations, as well as atomic and molecular optical spectroscopy.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Natural Science

A rigorous one semester overview of the structure, properties, and reaction of organic compounds. It is intended for students who are willing and able to move more quickly into advanced course work.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

Students perform basic organic lab techniques synthesis, recrystallization, separations,extraction, chromatography; introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy.

Developed by: Yanning Wang
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course acquaints students with the selected literary works from early China to the nineteenth century. It will provide the knowledge of pre-modern Chinese literature and culture and the analytical skills necessary for examining Chinese literary texts. Major literary genres (poetry, fiction, drama, and prose) and representative writers will be discussed. This course can be taken to fulfill the requirements for Chinese or Asian Studies major/minor, liberal studies and multicultural awareness. This course is taught in English and has no prerequisites.

Developed by: Feng Lan
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course introduces students to Chinese literature at the modern time spanning from the early twentieth century to the present. The course explores modern Chinese literature in its historical and sociopolitical contexts and, in particular, examines its role in the nation-building process of Modern China. Students will read English translations of Chinese works that were created by major writers during this period mainly from mainland China, as well as from Taiwan and the Chinese diaspora, and cover the primary literary genres—the novel, poetry, essay, and drama. The course can be taken for major or minor credits in Chinese and in Asian studies, and it meets the requirements of Liberal Studies For the 21st Century Competencies in the areas of Cultural Practice and Cross-cultural Studies. No knowledge of the Chinese language is required.

Developed by: Yanning Wang
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

Chinese folklore reveals intriguing and multifaceted traditions of China. Within this very broad and captivating field, we will focus on myths, legends, fairy tales, and some other popular components of folklore, such as cultural symbols, which can be constantly observed in present-day Chinese communities. Probing the cultural roots, transformations and adaptations of Chinese folklore, the subject matter of this course will span from antiquity to the present. This course can be taken to fulfill the requirements for Chinese or Asian Studies major/minor and multicultural awareness (Diversity X). This course is taught in English and has no prerequisites.

Developed by: Feng Lan
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course examines representative films produced in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan from diverse critical perspectives and in proper historical contexts. Studies Chinese cinema as both a unique genre of modern arts and a powerful sociopolitical discourse. Taught in English.

Developed by: Yanning Wang
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course introduces students to Chinese women’s writings up to the nineteenth century. Readings will also include some men’s writings on women to assist students with the exploration of women’s culture in pre-modern society, especially how women negotiated gender power as active agents rather than passive victims. This course can be taken to fulfill the requirements for Chinese or Asian Studies major/minor, liberal studies, and multicultural awareness. This course is taught in English and has no prerequisites.

Developed by: Feng Lan
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

The course introduces students to the foundational elements of Chinese civilization from a historical perspective. It focuses on major topics concerning China’s social, political, intellectual, religious, and literary traditions, and examines their formations and evolutions in historical contexts spanning from antiquity to the early 20th century. The selected course readings provide students with the opportunity to engage with primary source materials fundamental to Chinese civilization, and the pedagogy of the course enables students to develop adequate analytical and critical skills in dealing with sociohistorical issues that inform the cultural practices of the Chinese people. The course can be taken to fulfill the requirements for Chinese or Asian Studies major/minor and liberal studies (Diversity X). The course is taught in English and has no prerequisites.

Course Area: Ethics

This course presents basic ethical theories and analysis methods as they apply to ethical, social, and legal issues in computing and information technology. Case studies and hypothetical scenarios are discussed for their social, ethical, and legal implications, as well as analyzed through various ethical-analysis methodologies. The course fosters the development of skills in logical and critical analysis of issues and viewpoints.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course focuses on the production of evidence from people, objects, and information, the practice of which is commonly termed “forensic science.” This course emphasizes decision-making in forensic science examinations and evaluation of reliability for court. It uses the scientific method of hypothesis, testing, and analyzing results. The major forensic disciplines are covered and the course articulates the interaction of math, chemistry, biology, physics and earth science as the underpinnings of forensics.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This laboratory applies various techniques for the examination of physical materials generated during the commission of a crime in order to produce information required to detect and investigate criminal activity. This laboratory emphasizes the implementation of scientific protocols for collection and analysis of evidence and the calculation of associated error rates.

Developed by: Banyon Pelham
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course focuses on the integration of knowledge, skills, and capabilities learned in the program through a capstone project thought working with a Public Safety & Security Agency or Guided Research.

Developed by: Krista Flannigan
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course examines the role of courts in determining social policy as it relates to criminology. Emphasis is directed toward the political and social inputs that influence judicial decision making and the role of democracy and punishment in the courts. These topics are examined using current social policy.

Course Area: History
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This introductory level course engages with the Roman world from the point of view of the people who lived there. Students will study the different kinds of people who inhabited the Roman Empire, focusing on its multiethnic and diverse populaces, and on the ways in which, as in a modern city, rather different groups may have come into contact with one another. While the ancient Roman world will be the primary subject of study, the class will regularly draw on modern notions of identity formation and definition.

Course Area: History
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, "W" (State-Mandated Writing), Oral Communication Competency

This course is an introduction to different aspects of Greek, especially Athenian, culture, society, history and literature from the archaic age (8th-6th centuries BCE) through the classical era (5th-4th centuries BCE) and beyond. Our goal is to understand the Greeks through their words and the views of modern scholars, which students will encounter in their assigned texts, translations of primary sources, and through lectures.

Course Area: History
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, "W" (State-Mandated Writing), Oral Communication Competency

This course is an introduction to different aspects of Roman culture, society, history, and literature from the period of the monarchy (roughly eighth century BCE) through the Late Empire (fifth century CE). Our goal is to understand the Romans through their words and the views of modern scholars, which students will encounter in their assigned texts, translations of primary sources, and through lectures. Students will also sharpen their oral competency skills through participation in debates in a variety of roles.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course introduces students to the history of moden science in the ancient Near East, the Greco-Roman world, the world of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Although we tend to think of the modern world as the age of scientific reason, the foundation of our knowledge of the physical world and the diversity of on the planet Earth was built by man's unceasing curiosity to understand and control the environment, in both what he could see and what he could not see. Working with limited technology and resources, the people who studied the physical environment and life organisms in antiquity put together a working body of scientific knowledge from which the modern science disciplines grew.

Developed by: James Sickinger
Course Area: History
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course surveys the history of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age (3000-1000 B.C.) through the Hellenistic period and the Roman conquest of Greece (2nd century BC). It begins with the palace civilizations of Bronze Age Greece and traces the subsequent emergence of the Greek city-states in the Dark Ages and Archaic periods. Special attention is given to political, social, and economic features of the Greek city-states during the Classical period (ca. 480-323 BC). The course concludes with an examination of the transformation of the Greek world wrought by the emergence of Macedonia and Rome as major powers in the Mediterranean world.

Developed by: Christopher Pfaff
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course will introduce students to a wide variety of sporting events, especially those associated with the ancient Greek festival games, such as the Olympics, and the Roman gladiatorial arena and circus, and will consider a broad range of related topics, including: professionalism in ancient sports, rewards and prizes for victors, athletic training, facilities for training and competition, and the religious dimension of ancient sports. To explore these various topics, students will be exposed to a wide variety of evidence, including inscriptions, literary sources, architectural remains, vase-paintings, sculptures, and other types of archaeological finds. Modern athletic practice and sporting events, including the modern Olympics, Extreme Fighting, and NASCAR will provide an implicit, and sometimes explicit, field of comparison throughout.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines the concept of gender, and how attention to it can contribute to a better understanding of Greek literature, mythology, and culture in general. It explores how the construction of gender ideals informed works of Greek art and literature, and what role gender played more broadly in the legal, political, and social realms. The images, stereotypes, and experiences of female characters and Greek women receive a significant amount of attention, but the course also explores Greek concepts of masculinity, and what it meant to “be a man” (ἀνδρίζεσθαι) in ancient Greece.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Examines the Roman family in its various facets. The focus will not only be on the nuclear family but also on the broader concept of family which includes slaves and dependents. Midterm and non-­cumulative final; project required.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

The seminar in Classics is designed as a capstone course and is required for all Classics majors. Students must have completed at least 9 hours of coursework in departmental classes before the term in which they enroll in the seminar.

Course Area: History
Humanities and Cultural Practice

About 85 percent of all English vocabulary derives from Latin and Greek. Not only does modern scientific nomenclature derive from Latin and Greek elements, but the ancient languages continue to be the source from which new words are formed. But words represent also concepts, moral and social values, which are developed over a long period of time. Learning medical terminology gives the student on a pre-med track or in the social sciences the unique opportunity to critically examine, interpret, contextualize, and evaluate the history and ethical practices of one of the most desirable and influential professions in the 21st century. And since the meaning of the words in Latin and Greek is fixed, medical terminology, based on these words, is also stable in meaning. By teaching you how to break down any medical term into its composing elements (prefix, word root, and suffix), you will acquire the necessary skills to analyze and learn technical vocabulary, for your future career in medicine and/or its related sciences. The course will present medical terminology in the comprehensive method of a capite ad calcem (with the skills you will develop in this class, you will recognize this phrase as meaning “from head to foot”).

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

The study of Greco-Roman mythology offers an excellent window into the past by providing us with a unique opportunity to examine how the Greeks and Romans attempted to answer questions about the nature of the universe and mankind's place in it. The myths of any people betray attitudes concerning life, death, life after death, love, hate, morality, the role of women in society, etc.; we will pay particular attention to how Greco-Roman mythology addresses these important issues.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course provides students with an introduction to the mythological traditions from a diverse group of ancient cultures, including those of Greece and Rome, the Near East, Northern Europe, India, China, Africa, and the Americas. We will read extensively in translation from works of world literature on mythological subjects, in order to answer larger questions about how various cultures create the stories they live by. We will focus especially on narrative threads that appear in very differing cultures, as a main goal is to explore the ways in which a wide variety of societies share variants upon a basic story theme.

Developed by: James Sickinger
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines representations of the ancient Greco-Roman world in modern cinema. It is chiefly concern with the survival and reception of classical culture in twentieth and twenty-first century America. Students will read select works of ancient literature to gain some background in the ideals, values, and history of Greek and Roman culture. At the same time we will also consider how modern filmmakers have interpreted these works, and what their interpretations suggest about the changing meaning(s) of classical civilization in modern times. Some attention will be paid to questions of historical “fidelity”; i.e., how closely modern works “stick” to their ancient models. But our attention will also focus on how cinematic representations adapt and diverge from their classical counterparts, and how ancient Greece and Rome have served as vehicles for exploring contemporary concerns. Special attention will be paid to depictions of race, slavery, and sexuality, topics that figure prominently in ancient literature and that form central themes in modern film adaptations, ranging from Troy and 300 to Gladiator.

Developed by: Erika Weiberg
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

In this course, we explore two ideas central to Greek myth: home and homecoming. Again and again Greeks told stories—in Greek, mythoi—about a hero’s return home to his family and city after war and other adventures abroad. We will examine different versions of this story pattern, beginning with Odysseus’ return home from the Trojan War in Homer’s Odyssey. Together we will ask why the Greeks repeatedly told this story. What elements changed with each retelling? How do ancient concepts intersect with modern concepts of home and homecoming? What can we learn from the Greeks’ stories?

This course will challenge you to relate Greek myth to your own life in both creative and analytic writing assignments. Anyone interested in literature, psychology, theater, history, war and combat trauma, or gender studies will find a home here.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course provides students with theoretical background and practical experience in constructing messages for online communication, as well as managing self-presentation and professional relationships in the online environment. Coursework includes critical analysis of information sources and audiences and the development and delivery of online oral presentations.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course introduces contemporary issues in communication, including communication as an academic discipline, a major business and governmental policy sector, and a professional career. The class will review some historical and predominantly current issues, policies and practices that are central to the field of communication. The class will be organized around a series of faculty lectures and visiting professional presentations. Students will also have opportunities to participate in communication-related activities and events occurring during the semester.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This workplace-oriented course provides practical education and experience in the performance of informative, persuasive, and special occasion speeches through individual and group presentations. Fulfills OCCR requirement.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course provides overview of operations and applications of software packages; principles of design and presentation for print-based as well as audio-visual productions.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course is an overview and application of social marketing principles and campaigns. This course is designed to familiarize students with current theory and knowledge in the field of social marketing and to provide students experience with planning a social marketing campaign.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

Students select a topic of interest to pursue under supervision of a faculty member. Could be research/creative, pedagogy, service, or applied. Results in final project, scope and type to be defined by student and faculty supervisor.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course is to provide experience in methods and strategies of teaching communication concepts within the University context. Individually designed to accommodate student's background and objectives.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

Supervised internship. Credit proportional to scope and significance of work. Credit may not be applied to graduate degrees. Individually designed to accommodate student's background and objectives.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course covers fundamental concepts and skills of programming in a high-level language. Flow of control: sequence, selection, iteration, subprograms. Data structures: arrays, strings, structs, ADT lists and tables. Algorithms using selection and iteration (decision making, finding maxima and minima, basic searching and sorting, simulation, etc.). Good program design using a procedural paradigm, structure and style are emphasized. Interactive and file I/O. Testing and debugging techniques. Intended primarily for computer science or computer engineering majors, or anyone who is required to take COP 3330.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

Fundamental concepts and skills of programming in a high-level language. Students will be given a basic introduction to the Unix Operating system and all homework assignments must be completed using the g++ compiler. Additional topics include flow of control: sequence, selection, iteration, subprograms. In addition, the following Data structure topics will be covered: arrays, strings, structs, ADT lists and tables. Algorithms using selection and iteration (decision making, finding maxima and minima, basic searching and sorting, simulation, etc.). Good program design using a procedural paradigm, structure and style are emphasized. Interactive and file IO. Testing and debugging techniques. Intended primarily for Computer Science Majors who are required to take COP 3330.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Social Science

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture,ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

Writing Florida will build on the fundamental elements of fiction writing and will help students gain an overview of, and cultivate their own, aesthetically unique style that informs their Florida fiction. Through workshops and revisions, students will complete three written works set in Florida, either novel chapters or short stories.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Formative Experiences

Fiction Workshop is a course on the craft and art of fiction writing, only available for those students who have already satisfactorily completed Fiction Technique (CRW 3110). This course assumes you have a serious interest in fiction writing, as well as in discussing the writing of fiction with others likewise engaged. Our concerns are mainly practical and craftbased: where you as author wish to go with a particular draft, and how we, as readers and writers engaged in a common cause, might help you get there.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course is for poets who approach excellence and aspire toward publication. Poetry Workshop (CRW 4320) is a course on the art and craft of poetry, only available for those students who have already satisfactorily completed Poetic Technique (CRW 3311).

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is a survey of the development of dance in human culture with emphasis on dance as an art form. The major periods of dance history, choreographic masterworks, and artists in choreography and performance are explored through readings, discussion, media presentation, live performances, and movement laboratories. No prior dance experience is required.

Developed by: Hannah Schwadron
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course surveys approaches to the study of global dance perspectives and practices through emphasis on dance as expression of cultural, historical, social and political forces. Issues of tradition and innovation in select dance phenomena are especially explored through readings, discussion, media presentation, embodied experiences, and movement laboratories. While movement is a key component of this course, no prior dance experience is required.

Developed by: Jennifer Atkins
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice

This course introduces students to the history of ballet through a comparative study of classical dance forms around the world. Exploring what constitutes “classical” and reinventing classical, the course also focuses on larger cultural and historical movements as they influenced (or reflected) the codification of dance technique, gender theories of performance, and the role of dance in society. We will investigate these concepts through open, in-class conversations, the screening of classical dance works, and the reading and writing of critical essays and dance reviews.

Developed by: Hannah Schwadron
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course introduces students to a comparative study of contemporary dance forms, predominantly in Western culture. The course traces the development of modern and contemporary dance as reflective of larger cultural and historical movements, focusing on the codification of dance technique, gender theories of performance, and the role of dance in society. We will explore the articulation of these concepts through open, in-class conversations, the screening of contemporary dance works, and through the reading and writing of critical essays.

Developed by:
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines how cultural and artistic expression can both integrate and divide different groups of people along lines of race, gender, and class using African American dance as the central focus.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course provides training and aesthetic guidance for dance artists through the generation of computer-assisted imagery. It sets a foundation for future work in the areas of dance documentation, preservation, creation, promotion and multimedia performance.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course will provide senior dance majors with opportunities to develop a significant, original project through the cultivation of an individual studio or related studies practice and semester portfolio. The aim is to prepare students for entering the field after graduation from the BFA program. Emphasis is placed on verbal articulations of creative process as well as thoughtful critiques of dance works. Discussions and assignments on topics such as choreographers, dance company structures, contracts, mission and artist statements, the audition process, and current trends in the field will be included in the course. Studio time will be allotted for rehearsals, small group work and labs, informal presentations of in-process work, and critical response and feedback sessions.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course includes techniques for effective oral communication in settings most frequently encountered by the practicing engineer. Speaking skills will be applied in informal presentations, formal presentations, and interviews.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

Design and conduct experiments on fluid mechanics and heat transfer; analyze and interpret data, applying spreadsheets, statistical methods, and process models. Gain proficiency in operating basic chemical engineering equipment and instruments. Emphasis on safety, professionalism, teamwork, and oral & written communication.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

Structured programming techniques; numerical techniques useful in the solution of chemical engineering processes: root-finding techniques, direct and iterative approaches to solve linear systems, linear and nonlinear regression, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, statistical analysis of data; solutions of ordinary differential equations.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Developed by: Kimberly Hunter
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

Design and conduct experiments in reaction kinetics and chemical separations; analyze and interpret data, applying spreadsheets, statistical methods, and process models. Gain proficiency in operating basic chemical engineering equipment and instruments. Emphasis on safety, professionalism, teamwork, and oral & written communication.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This is the first course of a two-semester sequence on the analysis, synthesis, and design of chemical processes. This sequence prepares students for engineering practice. Students will integrate knowledge from prior courses with process economics, computer-aided design, engineering standards, and realistic constraints to solve open-ended process problems.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This is the second course of a two-semester sequence on the analysis, synthesis, and design of chemical processes. This sequence prepares students for engineering practice. Students will integrate knowledge from prior courses with process economics, computer-aided design, engineering standards, and realistic constraints to the design of chemical process facilities.

Course Area: Social Science

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination,money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.

Course Area: Social Science

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course introduces statistical inference, estimation theory, model building, and forecasting methods. Emphasis is on model building and policy analysis. Extensive use is made of PC econometric software.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course is an academic course related to the internship experience. Students are required to submit a weekly description of their internship activities, duties, and responsibilities; to complete a set of assignments; and at the end of the semester, to submit a paper that describes in detail the tasks they performed during the internship and discusses the skills and information required to accomplish each task. Students enrolled for six hours credit must also complete a research paper that integrates their classroom knowledge and work experience.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

The Experiential Certificate Program (ECP) allows all FSU degree-seeking students the opportunity to earn a certificate of recognition for engaging in a semester-long paid or unpaid career-related experience through which students develop knowledge, skills, and values from direct experiences outside a traditional academic setting. There is no academic credit, cost, or tuition associated with ECP. Students who complete the ECP can have this count as a Formative Experience. For more information, please contact the Career Center or visit career.fsu.edu/ECP.

Developed by: Katie Sherron
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

The course provides an overview of the U.S. health care system and the role that economics plays in advancing our understanding of it. Our topics will include the demand for medical care and health insurance, the role and impact of government in funding health care services (Medicare and Medicaid), cost benefit analysis, pharmaceuticals and the FDA, organ donation and vending, as well as health care and insurance in other developed countries. Throughout the course, you will have opportunities to improve your writing through instruction and assigned papers.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Developed by: Ella-Mae Daniel
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course examines the complexity of the full range of human groupings and cultural perspectives, as well as the complex relationships among them. Students will gain self-understanding in becoming culturally conscious participants in the global community through examining the differences between individuals and peoples, comparing cultures within the global community, and investigating diversity within Florida populations in general and school community populations in particular.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course is designed to provide specific knowledge and opportunities to apply skills in preparation for entering the education profession. Topics include classroom management, classroom routines, organizing for instruction, planning for instruction, effective communication, knowledge of legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers, and safe learning environments.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course covers fundamental topics in digital logic design, algorithms, computer organization, assembly-language programming, and computer engineering technology.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

The senior design project is the culmination of course and laboratory work in the bachelor’s degree program in each field of engineering. In this introductory course, students are introduced to the methods and conventions used in completing such a project. The course is mainly focused on the process of engineering design but lessons on technical skills will be included as well. Concepts in design, systems engineering, project management, engineering team organization, ethics, and professionalism are presented. Periodic written reports are required and used to satisfy the upper division writing (UDW) competency.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Oral Communication Competency

Senior students are exposed to the concepts in design, project management, engineering team organization, and professionalism. Students are grouped into design teams where these principles are put into practice in organizing, proposing, and developing an engineering project. Periodic written reports and oral presentations, and a final written report are required. The lecture material and texts provide instructions on project management, ethics, and design skills.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

Senior students are exposed to the concepts in design, project management, engineering team organization, and professionalism. Students are grouped into design teams where these principles are put into practice in organizing, proposing, and developing an engineering project. Periodic written reports and oral presentations, and a final written report are required. The lecture material and texts provide instructions on project management, ethics, and design skills.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

Senior students are exposed to the concepts in design, project management, engineering team organization, and professionalism. Students are grouped into design teams where these principles are put into practice in organizing, proposing, and developing an engineering project. Periodic written reports and oral presentations, and a final written report are required. The lecture material and texts provide instructions on project management, ethics, and design skills.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This practicum provides experience with individuals with high incidence disabilities.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course will mainly teach, from an engineering viewpoint, fundamental topics that are important for the practicing industrial engineer, including technical writing, oral communication and presentation of technical topics, managerial and cost accounting for production organizations and databases and management information systems. (Majors only)

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course is an introduction to the use of educational technology in teaching and learning. Students learn to use personal computers and other technology for communication, presentations, and resource acquisition.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course is an introduction to thermal-fluid engineering necessary to understand the principles of operation of the engine built and modeled in the laboratory course.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course is the first part of the engineering design systems course.

Note – To satisfy the Oral Communication Competency requirement, both EML4551C and EML4552C must be taken.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course is the second part of the engineering design systems course.

Note – To satisfy the Oral Communication Competency requirement, both EML4551C and EML4552C must be taken.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: English Composition
Designations: Statewide Core

This course includes drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Course Area: English Composition

ENC 2135 is the second of two required composition courses at Florida State University. While continuing to stress the importance of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills emphasized in ENC 1101, as well as the importance of using writing as a recursive process involving invention, drafting, collaboration, revision, rereading, and editing to clearly and effectively communicate ideas for specific purposes, occasions, and audiences, ENC 2135 focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course is for upper-level undergraduate students interested in writing nonfiction prose, especially but not exclusively what has come to be called “creative nonfiction,” such as the personal essay. The class is designed to help students improve their nonfiction writing through discussions of their work, exercises to practice craft, and explorations of published essays for techniques—ie. learning to read as writers.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

The primary purpose of Writing and Editing in Print and Online includes (1) helping students understand principles of composing, especially as they compare across different composing spaces; (2) writing for each of three spaces—print; screen; and network; (3) editing the texts deployed in each appropriately. To accomplish these goals, we'll engage with multiple kinds of texts—reading some, writing some, talking about some, creating digital forms of some. In all these processes, we’ll be developing a language that we can use to describe those texts and interactions and to describe what happens to them and to us when we do this work. If we succeed in these efforts, you’ll find that you are creating and reading texts differently; that you are much more informed about how others will read your texts; and that you bring a new theory and intentionality to your composing and editing.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

The goal of your internship is to provide you with practical experience in professional editing or writing. Students will gain valuable professional experience as well as learn about who they are as a writers, editors, and professionals. Although the FSU Career Center English Department Liaison and Seminole Link are great resources for helping students secure their internships, students are ultimately responsible for finding their own internship sites. Editing, Writing, and Media majors are required to complete 3 hours of ENC 4942 credit.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

An analytic and interpretative study of the codes and characteristics of one or more American film genres, such as comedy, gangster, western, detective, Film Noir, musical, war, and horror. Includes required film viewings. PREREQUISITE: ENC1101 and 1102, or equivalent.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course is a practicum intended to provide each student with practical experience in the field of literary editing. Students will work under the direction of the Senior Editor throughout the process of soliciting, judging, and editing manuscripts for the Kudzu Review. Students will also work together throughout the process of magazine lay-out as well as magazine printing and distribution.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This upper-division Scholarship In Practice course is designed to engage students in the authentic work of scholarly research in Renaissance/early modern literature. Hands-on work in research archives and databases will build toward a final research project with multimedia components.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

Topics vary. Required for senior English majors concentrating in literature.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

A survey of English Literature from its beginnings to 1790 with primary attention given to leading writers of the major periods and movements. Among authors typically considered are Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton. Midterm, final essay examination, and/or papers.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is a survey of English masterworks intended for students in liberal studies and those exploring a literature major. Among the authors typically considered are Wordsworth, Dickens, and Conrad.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Introduction to the study of Shakespeare at the college level. Consideration of representative genres – comedy, history, tragedy, tragicomedy – drawn from throughout the playwright’s career. Tests and critical papers will be required.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

Intensive focus on aspects of orality in Shakespeare's Sonnets, with some complementary work in theory, acoustics, and rhetoric. Requires oral presentations as 40% of grade; fulfills OCCR requirement. Explicit instruction in writing and presenting original critical talks, with specific feedback on them, plus chances to incorporate that feedback in another oral presentation.

Developed by: Ken Baldauf
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course teaches methods common to human-centered innovation frameworks such as Design Thinking: empathizing with people in given situations, framing and reframing problems, ideating, prototyping and testing solutions. Students will learn the process of developing products, services, systems and other solutions from the initial discovery of needs, to presenting a tested solution ready for deployment. This course features learning by doing with the vast majority of class time dedicated to collaborative exploration, supported by inspirational case studies, insightful video lessons from thought-leaders in the field, and abundant online resources.

Developed by: Ron Frazier
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course gives you the opportunity to critically assess current and emerging technologies you may want to be the cornerstone(s) of your professional career! You will learn a defined process for efficiently and effectively coming up to speed on new technologies and how to think critically about the economic potential, societal impact, and ethical considerations of new technologies.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course is designed to provide an experiential learning lab on how to perform business research and to apply that research to the Internship Sponsor. You will learn basic competitive intelligence techniques and utilize critical thinking skills to synthesize data and intelligence into a presentation that will provide a useful and practical result to the Internship Sponsor. These techniques can be applied to a wide range of industries.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This course is an introduction to the study of planet Earth, its internal dynamics, and surficial weathering, erosion, sedimentary processes, the composition and motion of its oceans and atmosphere, and its origin as part of the solar system. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1000, 1030 or 2010C.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This course is a laboratory introduction to earth science as the study of planet earth, specifically a study of minerals, rocks, maps, oceans and the atmosphere. Course prerequisite or corequisite: GLY 1030 or ESC 1000.

Course Area: History
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course provides a survey of Western traditions from the beginnings through the end of the Middle Ages. Emphasis is on patterns of thinking and on those institutions most distinctive for the Western tradition. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for EUH 2000. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.

Course Area: History
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is an introduction to key themes and problems in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Although this is an upper-level course, no prior background in European history is required.

Course Area: History
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course offers a history of the expansion of the British Empire and its evolution into the Commonwealth from the early eighteenth century to the present. It examines the complex set societies, governing structures, economic systems, and geographic locations encompassed by British overseas expansion.

Developed by: Nathan Stoltzfus
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

Who was Hitler, how did he come to power and what was his Nazi movement? Why did Germany slip so quickly from democracy to dictatorship? What chances did the German Weimar Republic have of surviving under the conditions that followed World War I? Why did Germans see Hitler as such a magnificent leader, and mobilize national energies around his programs? Was this due mostly to Nazi terror, anti-Semitism, and propaganda, or more to collaboration, social conformity, and willing participation? Did Hitler ever compromise? How did so many Germans find themselves supporting, directly or indirectly, the war crimes and genocide often characterized as the worst crimes of history? What was the Holocaust, and what did Germans know about it? Why are comparisons to Hitler so common (“he’s worse than Hitler”), and can they ever be relevant? Why is Hitler such a popular issue almost a century later? This course examines the background of the Nazi regime, the character of Hitler’s dictatorship, and the origins and course of WWII in its European context. Also examined is National Socialism’s impact on German institutions and racial consequences.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This class is an Introduction to Environmental Science and will cover the basic functioning of the earth's environmental system and human effects on that system.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Computer Competency, Natural Science Lab

This fully on-line, virtual-reality lab course has 8 lab modules covering various aspects of environmental science. Students submit lab reports on-line for each module that include data analysis and graphical interpretation.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Developed by: Jeremy Owens
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course will provide students with an opportunity to apply prior knowledge of the environmental sciences during a number of individual and group projects. The ‘capstone’ has a strong field component including on-campus field exercises and off-campus trips and students should be prepared for outdoor activity and travel. Throughout the course students will become familiar with the use of a variety of field instruments and techniques including basic surveying, sampling and safety. To strengthen professional communication skills, upper-division writing skills will be measured throughout the course. In an effort to help students clearly and effectively communicate scientific and technical writing techniques, this class will require students to produce high level summaries, presentations and reports. Additionally, students will leave this course with an up-to-date CV and a professional bio.

Course Area: Social Science

Examines the dynamics of contemporary family life and interpersonal relationships in a changing society and over the life course.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

For Family and Child Sciences majors. This course is designed to provide students with experience in a community setting serving children and/or their families. These experiences will provide students with opportunities to relate class materials with the work environment of child and family services and to develop basic intervention skills. In addition to experience in the field, class discussions focus on topics relevant to work with children and families. These include professional and social issues as well as the planning, implementing, and evaluating of appropriate activities and services.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course introduces students to cinema studies through weekly film screenings, analysis activities, and hands-on exercises in which students apply filmmaking principles in practice. Films studied represent a variety of genres, aesthetic traditions, and cultural contexts ranging from classical Hollywood and American independent films to foreign films and contemporary blockbusters.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course provides instruction in oral presentation and communication skills for professional settings in the motion picture industry.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course teaches conceptual and practical approaches to developing stories intended for short films. Students develop an original screenplay through multiple drafts and iterations.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

Production management for BFA thesis films.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This practicum course focuses on all creative aspects of BFA thesis production. Students will work in a variety of creative roles on thesis projects, which may include directing, producing, cinematography, production design, below-the-line crew, editing, visual effects and/or animation. Students will build upon their technical, aesthetic, and professional skill sets in the art of filmmaking, engaging in research, planning, director preps, principal photography, picture editing, asset construction, shot production, and other tasks as needed.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real world experience in the finance field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty adviser, and the internship director.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

In this course we study how modern Western fiction represents sexuality in a socio-cultural and political context. The course focuses on the modern novel and the ways in which it represents, questions, and critically dissects a variety of themes related to sexuality, such as sexual repression, sexual exclusion and victimization, sexuality and spirituality, the political implications of gender and sexual identity, etc.

Developed by: Marie-France Prosper
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This class is about oral expression, listening skills and vocabulary acquisition in French in a variety of domains. We will read, analyze, discuss, and debate articles from French magazines and newspapers. In addition, we will view TV programs and other resources available online. The topics deal with various socio-cultural realities of today’s Francophone world and are chosen for their general interest (allowing us to expand on some global issues and make comparisons with the US), and their relevance to you. The course will also include the viewing and discussion of at least one French or Francophone movies, listening to songs, presentations, and vocabulary building activities.

Developed by: Marie-France Prosper
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course is designed to help advanced-level French students improve their written and oral communication. In addition to two grammar and stylistics tests, and two research papers, the course will include two oral interviews, the second being an exit interview with the instructor and another professor in the department.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This Francophone cinema course is offered in two versions: one focusing on the relationship between cinema and Francophone cultures and societies, and another taking a chronological and thematic approach to the movements and directors of metropolitan French cinema. This course is taught in English and, with instructor permission, three hours may be used for major or minor credit. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Developed by: Virginia Osborn
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course addresses issues of race, gender, and class in a selection of works originally written in French by prominent women writers from different historical periods and geographical areas (France, French colonies, and French territories). The novelists chosen portray female protagonists struggling with what it means to be other than the norm: female, black, immigrant, and/or lower-class. In addition, we will consider whether gender influences writing. Are there recurrent plots, motifs or strategies in literature written by women? What can books by French women writers tell us about their experiences of social exclusion and self-determination in specific historical circumstances?

Developed by: Aimée Boutin
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course is a survey of French literature in context from the French Renaissance to the French Revolution. It introduces you to the major literary genres (poetry: lyric poetry, the sonnet, the fable; theater: comedy and tragedy; prose: the letter, the epistolary novel, the fairy tale) and aesthetic movements of each period, while perfecting your command of written and spoken French. This course has an important cultural component: beginning with the rise of humanism under King François Ie and continuing with the consolidation of absolute royal power under Louis XIV, students will be introduced to the historical context of each of the works we read. Activities will include reading a play together in class, learning seventeenth-century penmanship, and analyzing a variety of other cultural materials relating to early modern France (visual arts, architecture, music, etc.).

Developed by: Aimée Boutin
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course will introduce you to a selection of well-known works of French Literature and their cultural contexts. The readings have been chosen to exemplify the most significant literary movements of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including le siècle des Lumières, le romantisme, le réalisme, la modernité, le surréalisme, l’existentialisme, and la francophonie. This course has an important cultural component: beginning with the rise of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution, continuing with the modernization of post-Revolutionary society, (de)colonization, and the explosion of war on a world-wide scale, students will be introduced to the historical context of each of the works we read.

This course will be taught in French. By reading, writing, and participating in French, you will increase your comprehension and oral proficiency in the language. Although there will be key lectures in class every week, a substantial amount of time is devoted to discussion in French. It is essential that you do the assigned readings and come to class prepared to discuss them.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This is a regional geography course on Latin America; an area of South, Central and North America bound by the common languages of Spanish and Portuguese. Emphasis is given to the region’s uniqueness–particularly the fragile ecosystems, colonial legacies, land reform, trade, conflict, inequality and political stability–and its international standing–both within the western hemisphere and its relationship with the US, and globally within other economically developing regions.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency, Oral Communication Competency

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career. To enroll in this course, students must be upper-level business majors having completed the common prerequisites for business majors and the liberal studies English requirements.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This business internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real-world experience in the accounting field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director.

Course Area: Social Science

This course explores the causes of local and global environmental problems and their impacts, including resource use, pollution, ecosystems, and population growth.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is an introductory survey of geographic theories, issues and applications from the human perspective. In particular, how people interact with each other politically, economically, culturally and socially across distances, scales and within various physical environments. In addition, global contrasts are examined using urban versus rural habitation, local versus transnational trade, and uneven economic development.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course explores the impacts of culture as a force of geographical transformation—shaping the places and regions people occupy. Culture also plays a key role in politics, conflict, human- environment interactions, and the flow of ideas around the globe. This course investigates the geography of human behavior, such as material realities and constructed ideas of development, political rhetoric and action, and power in race and religion.

Developed by: Birgit Maier-Katkin
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

In this course, the objective is the ability to write and converse on general cultural topics at a level which demonstrates near mastery of German grammar and the beginning of a personal style in the language. The course is conducted in German.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

In this course, students will develop their German writing skills by exploring seven different writing genres (the review, the report, the journal, the case study, the essay, the research paper outline, and the debate). Additionally, students will prepare class presentations about specific advanced grammar and syntax topics and practice their language skills in language exercises and class activities. Students should also expect graded and ungraded in-class examinations, for example quizzes, dictations, and ungraded editing assignments. The course is taught in German.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

The course offers introduction to masterpieces of German literature from the nineteenth century to the present. As it uses works by authors of various ethnic, minority, and gender backgrounds that bring forth German representations of gendered or cultural “Others” and transcultural issues, the course enables students to develop critical competence in both literary analysis and diversity in Western (here: German) culture. By placing emphasis on cultural context and engaging students’ creative interaction with the material, the course offers non-German speakers general knowledge of German literary masterpieces and promotes their skills of understanding, interpreting, and writing about multicultural literature. The course also offers credit for German majors and minors.

Developed by: Christian Weber
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course covers the contextual and stylistic features of German cinema from its classical period, in the 1920s, to the New German Cinema, through the present. The course focuses on methods of film analysis and on film criticism. Taught in English.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course is an introduction to the acquisition, processing, and presentation of cartographic data.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course is a survey of GIS topics, including locational control, spatial data structures, modeling and analysis, and future trends in decision support, sensors, and geographic methods.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course is an introduction to geology as the study of planet Earth, its internal dynamics, and its surficial weathering, erosion, and sedimentary processes. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1030 or 2010C.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This course is a laboratory introduction to geology as the study of planet earth, specifically a study of minerals, rocks, maps. Course prerequisite or corequisite: GLY 1030 or GLY 1000.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course examines environmental issues as they relate to geological phenomena, which include volcanic and earthquake hazards, resource and land-useplanning, air and water pollution, waste disposal, glaciation and sea-levelchange, landslides, flooding, shoreline erosion, and global change issues. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1000 or 2010C. Credit can be received for taking GLY 1000L.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course examines the history of the earth and its organisms as recordedin the fossil and rock record; principles of geological and paleontologicalresearch; evolution of the dinosaurs, mass extinctions, and effects of pastcontinental movements on the diversity of life. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 2100. GLY 2100L recommended.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

This course is an introduction to surficial and internal processes affecting a dynamic planet Earth. For majors in geology and natural sciences. Two hour laboratory required. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1000 or GLY 1030.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course surveys sedimentary rock types, principles of description and classification,sediment genesis and origin of sedimentary deposits, analysis and synthesis of stratigraphic sequences. Topics include: depositional systems; physical and biostratigraphy; geochronology and chronostratigraphy; magnetic, seismic, and sequence stratigraphy; and tectonic vs. climatic controls. Term paper required.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is delivered online through Blackboard and is an introduction to coffees and teas of the world with a focus upon their importance to global cultures found in many regions. Students learn about these beverages and their unique interrelationship with their regional culture, heritage, and environment. Each beverage focuses upon specific regions of the world. Other non-alcoholic beverages, including energy drinks, bottled water, and carbonated beverages will also be explored.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is an introduction to ales and lagers of the world with a focus upon their importance to global cultures found in many regions. Students learn about these regional beers and the interrelation with their culture, including food, heritage, and festivals.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is an introduction to wines of the world with a focus upon the importance to global cultures. Students learn about these regional wines and the interrelationship with their cultures and heritage.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This is a course delivered online through Blackboard and is an introduction to distilled spirits of the world with a focus upon their importance to global cultures found in many regions. Students will learn about these regionally distilled beverages and their interrelationship with their culture, heritage, and environment. This class presents distilled spirits from various regions and countries of the world representing the USA, Canada, South and Central America, Asia, Europe, Africa and the Middle East, among others.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course is designed to explore the diverse verbal and non-verbal Western cultural habits, dress, behaviors, beliefs, service delivery expectations, and codes of conduct compared to the cultural mores, dress, traditions, political structure, behaviors (both verbal and non-verbal), travel, service delivery styles, and expectations of people from various international cultures.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

The course is designed to explore the world’s cuisines with a focus on the history of culinary arts, indigenous ingredients, customs, protocol, celebrations, religions, and various cooking methods and terminology.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This internship is designed to gain real world experience in the business field though on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional and the internship director.

Developed by: Nathan Line
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the principles of integrated marketing communications (IMC) in the hospitality and tourism industries. The term IMC refers to the development of marketing strategies and creative campaigns that weave together multiple marketing media (e.g., personal sales, advertising, social media, PR, etc.) to fulfill organizational goals. In this course, students will learn how to identify salient organizational stakeholders and how to use IMC to create a coordinated multi-channel marketing plan.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Developed by: Kristine Harper
Course Area: History
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Students in this course will learn how to conduct original research in Native American history. These skills will help students from various backgrounds learn how to ask questions, gather and assess data, and then employ them to make convincing arguments.

Developed by: Andrew Frank
Course Area: History
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

The course teaches how to conduct ethnohistorical research on Native Americans in the United States. The course culminates in the annotation and interpretation of a set of primary sources.

Course Area: History
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

The History of Science reveals the many ways in which the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and ethnicity have played a role in the modern science. The subject is replete with references to and judgments of race, class, gender, and ethnicity. Though scientists have claimed objectivity, at times their views have been shaded by prevailing societal perspectives. By directly engaging the dynamic between science and society, this course provides students with a deeper understanding of science and society as well as race, class, gender, and ethnicity.

Course Area: History
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines the development of public health and the history of medicine in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Topics cover changes in medical knowledge, the medical profession, government responsibilities, and public responses; how individuals accept, modify, or reject medical authority; how race, class, gender, and ethnicity shape health practices and the delivery of medical care; how the health of a community can be protected; and what constitutes a public health hazard.

Developed by: Kristine Harper
Course Area: History
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course examines the interrelationship between science, mathematics, and society from the time of the Babylonians to the present day, and how these lessons related to placing the secondary math and science curriculum into historical context.

Developed by: Jennifer Koslow
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course offers an overview of the different specialties of public history, the historic preservation movement in the US, archives, history museums, oral history, commemoration, and the use of new media for public presentations of history.

Developed by: Jennifer Koslow
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course examines the theory and practice of the ways in which history is collected, preserved, and interpreted using digital mediums.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

An upper division Scholarship in Practice and Writing Competency course, the senior seminar provides advanced training in historical methods. Topics vary from seminar to seminar depending upon the instructor's area of expertise.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course provides students with the opportunity to engage in a formative active learning experience: working in a cultural institution that collects, preserves, and presents history for general audiences. It exposes students to the diversity of possible career paths related to the field of public history.

Course Area: Ethics
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines how cinema has provided a unique framework for wrestling with the implications of the modern scientific enterprise, examining how easily scientific rationality can be harnessed to both moral and immoral ends and what kind of world that science has produced. By probing a variety of genres - including biography, documentary, historical drama, science fiction, political satire, and horror - this course observes the cinematic and cultural desire to make sense of science. A critical element of the course is diversity in the Western culture through the lens of race, class, gender, and ethnicity.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Statewide Core

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from Antiquity to the Present Day. Beginning with the contemplation of the Book of Job, students will become acquainted with a variety of ways human beings have searched for meaning. In this course, students will gain an overview of the development of Western culture from Antiquity to the present as it is expressed through the arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, music, film and the performing arts), and especially through literature. Students will study and analyze a variety of texts (either as excerpts or full text) of the Western world along the lines of: The Epic of Gilgamesh, Iliad, Oedipus Rex, Aeneid, Song of Roland, Beowulf, Inferno, Hamlet, Frankenstein, The Death of Ivan Ilyich, The Metamorphosis, and works by selected Western poets. From the earliest examples of Roman and Greek art, this course introduces students to the cultural and artistic movements of the Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Enlightenment, Rococo, Neoclassical, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist, Modernist, and Post-Modern, to the present day. This course examines the human condition through culture and the arts to better understand how the humanities are interconnected. The chief goal and focus of this course is to show how the past forms the basis of Western present-day values, artistic expression, and institutions.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course traces the origins of humanistic thought and human achievement from the dawn of human civilization through the fall of the Roman Empire. In this class, students will encounter the fundamental origins of many of Western Civilization's most cherished political, philosophical, and religious ideas, through reading the great literature of this period and studying the developments in art and architecture for which the Ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome are so justly famous. Students will emerge from this class with a greater understanding of the cultural, ideological, and artistic directions taken by modern Western culture.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Students will gain an overview of the development of Western culture from A.D. 565-1750, as it is expressed through the arts (painting, sculpture, architecture; literature, and music), and especially through literature. Students will study and analyze some of the great literary works of this time period, including The Song of Roland, Dante's Inferno, Shakespeare's Hamlet, and selections from St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, and Beowulf. Beginning with the fall of the Roman Empire and continuing through Byzantine, Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods, this course examines the human condition through culture and the arts to better understand how the humanities are interconnected. The chief goal and focus of this course is to show how the past forms the basis of Western present-day values, artistic expression, and institutions.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

In this course, students will gain an overview of the development of Western culture from A.D. 1666 to the present as it is expressed through the arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, music, film and the performing arts), and especially through literature. Students will study and analyze some of the great literary works of this time period, including Frankenstein, The Queen of Spades, The Death of Ivan Ilyich, The Metamorphosis, The Guest, and works by selected Western poets. Beginning with the end of the Baroque era and rise of the Enlightenment, and continuing through the Rococo, Neoclassical, Romantic, Realist, Naturalist, Impressionist, Modernist, and Post-Modern, to the present day, this course examines the human condition through culture and the arts to better understand how the humanities are interconnected. The chief goal and focus of this course is to show how the past forms the basis of Western present-day values, artistic expression, and institutions.

Developed by: Aimée Boutin
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice

This course explores mobility in the big city through the eyes and ears of the flâneur who saunters aimlessly and leisurely as he or she observes scenes in the big city. We will investigate the political, aesthetic, sociological, and historical meaning of walking in London by reading influential works from a range of disciplines—as well as by doing it.

The course will combine theory with practice: students will learn how the term flâneur or “man about town” became shorthand for modernist notions of leisure, spectacle, and elite urban experience across a range of disciplines, from literary studies and art history to urban studies and media theory. Using tools of keen observation, critical awareness, and discussion to think about how, where, and why we walk, students will develop a keener sense of the changing meanings of mobility; of the treatment of national identity, gender, class, and race in relation to urban mobility and sense of place; and of sensory interactions with the social or built environment.

Developed by: Kathryn Stoddard
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course is designed to develop writing skills by exploring the development of the idea of humanism from its pre-Greek form in the Ancient Near East to the present day. Students will become familiar with the central works of humanistic literature and art from each period, as well as the evolution of the concept of “human rights.” By the end of the course, students will be able to express in lucid English prose how the concept of humanism arose, how it has evolved, and the way in which it continues to shape and define Western Civilization through the humanities.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines the impact of American Cinema on social relations and on the reproduction of power. By watching movies with a better understanding of their biases and prejudices we may confront them and contest them in order to celebrate the cultural diversity of the United States. The student will benefit from this course by learning a matrix of movie history, movie genres, and approaches to multiculturalism by which to judge movies, cultural representation and the cultural experiences of life. The movies provide a window into middle and late 20th century cultures, which serve as comparisons and contrasts for culture in the 21st century.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course examines the impact of society on human food ways, role of foodand nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

The world today needs more people who can think critically and creatively about a problem and develop ways to find a solution. FSU’s Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program aims to help students become these types of thinkers. By introducing students to research and giving them the opportunity to work as research assistants to faculty members, the program aims to cultivate students’ curiosity about the world and their capacities to contribute to it. Specifically, UROP hopes that participants will gain research experience and skills, acquire in-depth knowledge of a field or discipline, cultivate professional and mentor relationships with researchers, network with like-minded students, become more competitive for graduate school and careers after college, and help advance a faculty member’s research.

Developed by: Katherine Mooney
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

This class traces the evolution of two foundational questions: 1) how have Americans defined themselves and their nation in the last 150 years; and 2) how have racial, sexual, and other forms of difference been dealt with in this country. The course analyzes athletics, music, movies, and other popular forms and pastimes as evidence of how Americans have answered these questions differently over this period. Students will be reading, viewing and listening to a variety of primary sources (sources created in the time we’re talking about) and secondary sources (sources created by later folks analyzing the time we’re talking about). Some of class will be lecture-based, as I offer you context for what you’re examining (so don’t be worried about how much or how little American history you already know!). But we’ll also be discussing what you’re reading and looking at as well as doing daily exercises that will help you practice the skills you’ll need to succeed in the course and in other courses.

Developed by: Amy Burdette
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

This course will focus on a number of modern sexual and reproductive health issues including: demographic trends in fertility, the social construction of sexual and reproductive health, reproductive rights and child health movements, the medicalization of sexual functioning, and the effects of racism, poverty and sexism on sexual health and reproduction. Students in this course will analyze and synthesize information centering on a number of current sexual and reproductive health issues. Course materials will include the interdisciplinary theorizing of feminists, medical social scientists, anthropologists, demographers, and public health scholars. We will explore a variety of topics including: demographic trends in fertility, the social construction of sexual and reproductive health, reproductive rights and child health movements, the medicalization of sexual functioning, and the effects of racism, poverty and sexism on sexual health and reproduction. Students will learn to engage these issues through lecture material, media presentations, daily student led discussions, intensive writing assignments, evaluating the written work of others in the class, and individual presentations.

Developed by: Deana Rohlinger
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of collective behavior and social movements. This course is organized to highlight themes in the Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins as they relate to social movement theory. The course cover theories related to collective behavior, revolutions, and social movements in order to better understand contemporary change.

Developed by: John Marincola
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

This course offers a comparison of the ways in which societies respond to defining, and sometimes traumatic, events in their histories. Using the Persian Wars of the 5th c., in which a small and often disunited group of Greeks successfully fought off the invasions of the powerful Persian Empire, and the attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001 as the major touchstones for our investigations, we shall look at some of the important ways in which societies remember, memorialize, and try to come to grips with major events in their histories. These occurrences are both literally epoch-making for their respective societies, and both are represented in a wide variety of artistic and cultural media. Our main topics of focus will therefore be formal literary texts and monuments, but also the contemporary debates surrounding how to construct memorials to remember the victims and events of 9/11. We shall employ recently developed historical methodologies on collective memory by Maurice Halbwachs, on constructed history by H. J. Gehrke, and on places of memory (lieux de memoire) by Pierre Nora.

Developed by: Jessica Clark
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

In this class, we will explore current controversial issues in American society through their counterparts in ancient Greece and Rome. Many of the same topics that divide us today were also the subject of intense debate in the past, such as capital punishment, voting rights, the use of military force, sexualities, religion, and the relationship between individual rights and collective interests. We will extract selections of debates from great works of Classical literature, explore the strengths and weaknesses of opposing arguments, and engage with the parallels that have ensnared political culture in our own day. Throughout, we will be concerned with the question of whether political conflict is integral, or an obstacle, to the embodiment of democratic principles.

Developed by: Aline Kalbian
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

Our relationship to money is complicated. We need it to sustain ourselves materially, but we also worry about how it can become an impediment to our overall flourishing. Religious communities have had some very specific insights about money, how we pursue it, and what we do with it. Is it the root of all evil? Does it get in the way of our spiritual goals? How do we define wealth and poverty? How much money do we need to live well? When does the pursuit of money become greed? What is society’s responsibility to the poor? In recent years these questions have taken on an even more urgent tone as some citizens attain unprecedented levels of wealth while growing numbers fall deeper into poverty. This e-series honors seminar addresses some of these questions about the ethics of money from the perspective of religious communities. We will evaluate the topics of need (as exemplified by poverty) and greed (as exemplified by excessive accumulation of wealth), by looking at historical and contemporary religious writings, ethnographic studies, economic theories, literary narratives, and films. Students will engage in broad, critical and creative thinking about the connections between money, human nature, the good life, material well-being, the common good, and social justice. They will gain knowledge and critical thinking skills that will assist them as they navigate a range of personal and professional issues related to money.

Developed by: Guenter Piehler
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

This seminar will focus on the social history of the American GI in World War II by reading their letters, diaries, and other documents they created. It will consider the demographic profile of the men and women who served in the American military, why they fought, and how they coped with the experience of total war. Special attention will be given to the religious experiences of the GI at war and issues of race, ethnicity, and gender. This seminar will also examine the reintegration of the American GI into American society after 1945. It will explore the impact of the GI Bill of Rights, as well as issues of physical disability and post-traumatic stress that afflicted millions of veterans. The issues examined in this course address persistent issues and real world problems that still impact the US and the FSU community. Today, American men and women continue to fight in war and they face many of the challenges faced by the World War II generation.

Developed by: Alexander Avina
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

This course explores the history of Cold War Latin America through two analytical lens that fueled much of the political and socio-economic struggles of the era: Empire and Revolution. Students will analyze why and how Latin Americans used revolutionary methods to change their everyday lives—and the imperial responses of the United States government.

Developed by: Tingting Zhao
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

Students will have opportunities to observe and inquire about sustainable practices through field studies at local organic farm, hydro-power station, new urbanism community, and recycling facilities etc. as well as through interactions with community-based programs. Students will be engaged in critical thinking about sustainability of human society and environment from various aspects that include producers, consumers, public service sectors, and policy makers. This course also offers opportunities to learn and use qualitative and quantitative research methods commonly adopted in social science disciplines.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

Persistent Issue or Real World Problem: Cinema is a powerful medium that shapes how people understand themselves as well as how they understand other people and cultures. Through representations of reality and illusion, cinema is used to enlighten, inform, incite, and manipulate audiences. This course explores this elusive and continually shifting boundary between reality and illusion, with a focus on world cinema. The course asks students to analyze and reflect on questions including: How do films offer insight into the cultures and periods in which they are produced? How do films portray social attitudes and reveal cultural assumptions? How does the ability of film to stage, manipulate, and distort events, emotions, and attitudes negate or contaminate the ability of film to build understanding, empathy, and credibility? This examination of cinema will be expansive and generous, ranging from contemporary and historical international films to documentaries and experimental work. Each week, students will view films from around the world, exposing them to a large diversity of cultures, experiences, politics, languages, beliefs, and traditions. Each screening will provide a unique and creative approach to storytelling and the craft of filmmaking often not implemented in traditional Hollywood or American independent film productions. Critical reading and writing assignments will help students analyze, compare, and reflect on films in their cultural, historical, and ideological contexts. In this way, students will be able to investigate and deepen their awareness of how cinema as an art form influences and shapes our understandings of others and ourselves.

Developed by: Michelle Kazmer
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

Information literacy—including the ability to seek, gather, store, analyze, assess, evaluate, and represent information—will be paramount for career and life success in all contexts in the 21st century. This course offers hands-on activities including advanced information seeking; rigorous, systematic information quality assessment; and multimedia information representation.

Developed by: Mary Stewart
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

Creativity fuels innovative thinking. In our primary course text (titled Sparks of Genius), physiologist Robert Root-Bernstein and historian Michele Root-Bernstein explore thirteen characteristics of creativity that are applicable to any field. In our secondary text (Uncommon Genius: How Great Ideas Are Born), trial lawyer Denise Shekerjian interviewed forty MacArthur Prize winners—from paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould to clown Bill Irwin—seeking to determine “how great ideas are born.” Each interview expands and enriches our exploration of creativity. Additional readings (and possibly, guest speakers) will take our ideas even further. A dialog between hands-on experiments with visual composition, writing, and targeted research will provide students with multiple means of exploring both the topic and developing their own creative processes. No prior experience with art is needed: just a willingness to get involved and deeply explore the sources and implications of creativity. http://www.marystewart.info/

Developed by: Adam Gaiser
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

Over the centuries the Islamic community has fragmented into sects, denominations and schools who have disagreed and fought with each other over who preserves the truest and most correct form of Islam. How did this variety come about? How did different Muslims come to view the questions of “orthodoxy” and “heresy”? How can scholars account for the many Islamic outlooks within the Islamic world? How does militancy play a role in the manifestation of sectarianism? In recent years these questions have taken on an even more urgent tone as sectarian and Islamist violence affects different parts of the globe. This course addresses some of these questions about the variety of Islamic religious perspectives. We will evaluate the topics of Islamic sectarianism and denominationalism by tracing the main sectarian movements among medieval and modern Muslims. Students will engage in broad, critical and creative thinking about the creation of “orthodoxy” and “heresy,” the development of religious differences, the interaction between politics, culture and religion, and the issue of religious violence. They will gain knowledge and critical thinking skills that will assist them as they navigate a range of perspectives and trajectories related to the world’s many different Muslims.

Developed by: Mickey Damelio
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

Blindness, of all disabilities, arguably generates a powerful emotional reaction in our society. There are many misconceptions, myths, fears, and expectations associated with blindness. In this course, we will explore blindness, talk with people who are intimately familiar with blindness (both blind themselves, and also those in a family or relationship with someone who is blind), and experience adventure under blindfold. We'll explore our society's reaction to blindness, probing its roots, and take a closer look at how views of blindness are shaped when experienced through the lenses of gender, race, class, religion, and ethnicity. Through blindfold experiences, students will have opportunities to learn about braille and the activities of daily life necessary, learning that blindness does not change the ability to be independent, and that disability doesn't prevent anyone from being an equal player in our society.

Developed by: Mark Zeigler
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series, Oral Communication Competency

The course addresses the role of public communication in a democratic form of government. It acquaints students with the principles of public speaking and role the practice plays in all professions. In addition to learning all the skills necessary to become effective public speakers, the student will gain knowledge of the role the skill plays in the origination and success of social justice movements. A particular emphasis is placed on the importance of public speaking in social justice movements, the rhetoric of social responsibility, and on how we engage issues of social responsibility in our formal communication.

Developed by: Michael Trammell
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

What happens when business and culture collide? We will explore the intersections of communication, culture, and business and address the often surprising problems that arise. Students will grapple with these issues in both an international and domestic context. As a class, we will study business environments and negotiation scenarios rife with cross-cultural miscommunication and conflict. Through experiential exercise and discussion sessions, we will learn ways to overcome these problems through understanding the importance of respecting other cultures' norms. Through a half dozen writing assignments, two to three presentations, and a group project, students will become sensitized to the urgency and challenges of international business for U. S. enterprise; have a strong understanding of fundamentals of international business with respect to world markets and environments; and learn to fit in quickly and perform in the international business marketplace.

Developed by: Barry Faulk
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This is a course in popular music that will make students think critically and creatively about the role that music plays in their everyday lives. It will introduce them to a rich tradition of critical and artistic work that tries to make sense out of sound, and that considers the relation between the musical arts and literary traditions.

Developed by: Eric Walker
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

Human reproduction and parenting in the 21st century are wildly perplexing mash-ups of practices including sperm and/or egg donation, wombs for hire, artificial reproduction technology (ART), kinship adoption, transracial adoption, international adoption, single parent adoption, LGBTQ adoption, child trafficking, foster care systems, celebrity adoption, and a legion of other ethically complex and often vexed behaviors. This course samples prominent cultural representations of adoption and surrogacy in recent literature and film and explores forms of public debates about these headline-grabbing issues.

Developed by: Frederick Davis
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

Environment & Society asks, "What is the relationship between humans and the natural world?" Environmental History explores how nature has helped to shape culture as well as how humans have modified the natural world and transformed the land in the process of extracting resources, building structures, producing pollution, and importing exotic species. This interdisciplinary course in environmental history explores numerous diverse perspectives of the environment: history, ethics, literature, art, and, of course, science.

Developed by: Valliere Richard Auzenne
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

This course focuses on critically examining the work of influential animators and the techniques they employ. Through animation screenings, discussion, and hands-on animation exercises, students will be exposed to diverse animation styles and approaches, create original short animations, and come to better understand the creative process utilized in animation.

Developed by: Lisa Tripp
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

“The media” are often a blamed in contemporary discourses for contributing to a wide range of social problems with today’s youth ranging from bullying and social alienation to rampant consumerism and poor body image. But what’s really going on in practice? How are children and youth actually interacting with media and how do those interactions influence their lives, identities, and cultures? To answer these questions, this course examines media ranging from X-Men and Dora the Explorer to Facebook and youth-produced media, introduces practical research methods for studying young people’s media practices, and provides hands-on practice developing media products intended for child and youth audiences.

Developed by: Joseph Pierce
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

Can cities like Detroit be saved, or are they destined to become ghost towns? This course explores the nature of urban poverty, the relationship between poverty and urban success, and the reasons why some cities “fail” and shrink while others “succeed” and grow. Students will learn how scholars and planners understand urban decay, and propose an intervention in a specific city to help reverse (or reduce the negative implications of) shrinking cities.

Developed by: Ned Stuckey-French
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Oral Communication Competency

A revolution has occurred. The world is now digital. This course explores the implications of the digital revolution: what it means for the publishing industry, books, magazines, copyright, libraries, how we read and write, and how we organize ourselves as a society. This revolution has come swiftly and been sweeping. A decade ago there was no iPhone, iPad, Kindle, Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, Pinterest, or Snapchat. We read, write and speak differently now than we did then, and this course will investigate those differences and what they might mean for our culture, our future, and us.

Developed by: Maria Morales
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

The language of human rights has shaped international political discourse since the end of World War II. Yet who counts as human? In 1979 the international community first adopted the Convention Against All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, which is informally considered the international bill of women's rights. In 1995 the Beijing Declaration specifically recognized women's rights as human rights and gender equality as a matter of grave international concern to be treated as in everybody's interest. The target of many international documents then and since, as well as of analyses of global gender inequality, has been primarily arguments from custom and tradition as key sources shaping the theory and practice of the gendered lives of women everywhere. Not all appeals to custom and tradition are in themselves problematic. Yet some are both problematic and the subject of contestation by universalist and cultural relativists about human rights. In this course we will examine the assumptions underlying these arguments and evaluate appeals to “culture” on their merits. In particular, we will discuss appeals to custom and tradition, including religious traditions, often used to insulate groups of women and girls from domestic and international human rights protection. We will address the global systematic phenomenon of violence against women in times of peace and war, the global system of traffic of women and girls, and such “cultural” practices as genital mutilation and child marriage among others. Finally, we will discuss issues that differentially affect the lives of women for the worse, as in the case of refugee women, or for the better, as in paths to freedom through personal and economic development.

Developed by: Krzystof Salata
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

This is an interdisciplinary course that combines performance and performance theory with critical theory and philosophy. The course will focus on the phenomenon of the human encounter: What does it mean to meet? What is at stake in the encounter? The students will read excerpts from modern and postmodern philosophy and create simple short performances in response. They will examine the potentiality and relevance of the encounter in today’s society.

Developed by: Kathryn Tillman
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

"Racial inequality has been a persistent problem since the beginning of our history as a nation. Despite a move towards greater equality since the Civil Rights Movement, we continue to see significant and enduring racial/ethnic gaps in employment, education, and health outcomes, as well as many other indicators of well-being. In this E-series honors seminar we will explore the issue of contemporary racial inequality and the social factors that influence relations between and among different ethnic and racial groups in our country. Specifically, this course has been designed to provide students with information about trends and patterns of racial inequality in the U.S. today, allow them to explore competing explanations for continuing racial inequality, and challenge them to propose and critically assess ideas about potential mechanisms for change. * Bryan Hall Honor Students Only"

Developed by: Keith Howard
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

Spaniards “discovered” and named Florida in the early sixteenth century and ruled over it for three centuries after that. In this class we will explore how the idea of Florida took shape and shifted in the minds of Spaniards throughout the three centuries that it was a colonial possession of the successive Spanish monarchs. To this end, we will read and discuss a selection of texts (in English translation) that reveal these Spainards’ hopes, triumphs and failures as they surveyed the land, fought with and evangelized the native populations, and defended their monarchs’ possession. Throughout, we will consider how our reconstruction of the Spanish vision of Florida may enrich and even alter our understanding of Florida today.

Developed by: Michael Kaschak
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

Language is a central element of human experience. It is a fundamental part of all cultures, and pervades virtually every moment of our waking (and sometimes, our sleeping) lives. This course is intended to introduce students to different approaches to understanding language, and to provide a vehicle for thinking about how our knowledge of language can be applied to solve real world problems in different domains (e.g. education, law, and politics). This course examines language from multiple perspectives-neuroscience, cognitive science, linguistics, education, sociolinguistics-and will explore the ways that these perspective share common ground (or not). There will be three sections of the course: Body, Mind, and World. Each section will take a different perspective on language, and will include small written assignments that will provide students with the opportunity to learn to communicate to a broad audience about different scientific methods and approaches, and their implications for the real world. Each section will also include examples of applying knowledge about language to real world problems (e.g. knowledge about language learning can be applied to the widespread problems associated with literacy development). The capstone of the course will be a group project that uses one or more approaches to language to tackle a real world problem. Class meetings will be interactive, with ample opportunity for discussion, participation in research demonstrations, learning to use research tools (e.g. linguistic corpora), and brainstorming about ways to apply knowledge about language to problems that exist in the world.

Developed by: Jennifer Atkins
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

Beyoncé and other pop culture icons are incredibly important in understanding our cultural attitudes, especially in relation to gender and the body. By examining popular culture (TV shows, movies, music videos, and more), this class aims to use theories of the body and interpretations of bodies in performance to investigate American gender in the 21st century and to question what our bodies reveal about identity. Because of this, the course begins by looking at the world of concert and social dance to begin to understand how the human body is “staged” and how bodies in motion are intimately connected to issues of gender and other cultural concerns, such as race and class.

Developed by: Matthew Goff
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

Noah's Flood has been a topic of enduring interest for over 2,000 years. It sparks the imagination with issues such as the rise of evil in the world and God's re-creation of the earth. In this class we will examine the biblical flood story in a broad context. We will examine other flood stories from the ancient Near East that influenced how the biblical story of the flood was written. We will look at how the flood story in the Bible was interpreted, from antiquity up until today. We will also examine how the flood story had been a locus for contemporary debates involving religion and science since the 1600s.

Developed by: Stephanie Pau
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

Science does not always involve a white lab coat. The scientific process often begins with making observations of the natural world. This course addresses scientific research design and field data collection for the natural sciences through hand-on field labs, with a focus on sampling design and survey methods for plant populations. The principles covered in this course will address real world environmental problems such as monitoring endangered species, habitat management for wildlife populations. Opportunities for discussion and interaction occur during the 8 field labs, where students have the opportunity to apply methods that have been covered in lectures and readings, and discuss the biases and tradeoffs in different approaches with the instructor and other students.

Developed by: Kathleen Burnett
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

Many diverse ethical challenges face us in the global information age. This course identifies past, present and future information ethics challenges and encourages students to develop their own standpoints from which to address them. The primary purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to make informed ethical decisions about information production, management and use. Students explore and apply a wide range of ethical theories to examine critical information ethics issues raised by recent advances in information and communication technology.

Developed by: Pamela Robbins
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

Political and social protests are a fact of life in the United States. Protest movements have effectively used songs in the past to convey their message and will continue to do so in the future. This course challenges students to consider how songs may be created or adapted to protest movements.

Developed by: Andrew Frank
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

Osceola is the most famous Seminole Indian and widely known for leading a campaign of resistance during the Second Seminole War. This is the case even though he was not a national or tribal leader, village chief, leading warrior, or medicine man. This class unravels this contradiction and asks how and why it came to be. The course uses the Seminole Osceola to understand how historical “truths” are transferred into the present. The class reexamines Osceola’s place within Seminole society and explores how his reputation emerged after his death and continued to grow in decades that followed. Students will determine who was responsible for creating Osceola’s reputation and the particular stories that accompany it. We will also explore the motives for making him or remembering him as “Chief.” In the process, we will grapple with the connections between modern memory and historical evidence.

Developed by: David Kirby
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

While we might not admit it, every thinking person wants to be a public intellectual, that is, somebody who deals with the best ideas but in a way that speaks to the broadest possible audience. In this class students will read, discuss, and write about six public intellectuals, each of whom is a thinker who, rather than merely contributing to a particular discipline (though they have certainly done that), has used that discipline to explicate the world, thereby making both more alive and dynamic.

Developed by: Michael Ruse
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

This seminar is based on some fifteen great films of the 20th century, using them as a vehicle to explore important philosophical questions about the nature of reality, the meaning of life, the right moral course of action, the roots of great art, and much more. Each week we will look at one film, followed by discussion, and then every student will write a short (500 word) essay on the film and its philosophical implications and importance. Essays will be graded promptly and feedback given to students. A tentative list includes “Shane,” “Some Like it Hot,” “Triumph of the Will,” “The Searchers,” “District 9,” “Ballad of a Soldier,” “The Seventh Seal,” “The Passion of Joan of Arc,” “Bell de Jour,” “Four Hundred Blows,” “The Grand Illusion,” and others. There is no text and no final exam. Grades will be based on classroom performance and written work.

Developed by: David McNaughton
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

This course examines three main questions: (1) Can we explain the existence of our earth, and the universe as a whole, without recourse to God? (2) Can there be an objective moral code that we all have good reason to follow even if there is no God? (3) Can we have a spiritual or religious attitude to the world in the absence of belief in God? Until recently, most people thought that the answer to each of these questions was, No. But these answers are open to challenge. Scientists have claimed that we can have a complete and satisfying explanation of the existence and nature of everything without appealing to intelligent design. Moral philosophers have claimed that right and wrong are wholly independent of God’s will. Indeed, some have thought that religion has retarded ethical development and understanding. Finally, and perhaps most intriguingly, many thinkers now suggest that agnostics and atheists can have a religious attitude of awe and reverence to the universe, and find life fully meaningful, without any belief in supernatural beings.

Developed by: Robin Goodman
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Ethics Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course will train students in the uses of analytical languages and concepts. We will seek to define useful terminologies like “colonialism,” “imperialism,” “postcolonialism,” “globalization,” and “neoliberalism.” The course will also teach students how to use such concepts to analyze visual works, and will give students the tools for analyzing visual works in relation to histories of conflict and struggles over power. By learning how seminal issues within postcolonial and film studies are framed, students in this course will be able to apply some of these languages and concepts in the construction of their own arguments, the analysis of texts, and methods of inquiry both in this field and others. **This class requires viewing of often violent and disturbing images.**

Developed by: Sherry Southerland
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

How are mathematics and science being taught? How should they be taught? In what ways may mathematics and science teaching change in the coming years? This course offers an introduction to pressing issues in mathematics, science, and mathematics and science education. These include the role of these disciplines in the 21st century, disparate educational opportunities, the nature of mathematics and science, what it means to learn, innovative instructional approaches, the role of assessment, and the motivations for and implications of recent reform movements. These ideas will be explored through a variety of forms of interaction, including lecture portions, individual and group activities, and whole-class discussions.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is for students interested in learning how to communicate with those who are culturally different. As such, it is designed to introduce and expose students to worldviews, traditions, and values, etc. from the perspective of cultures other than their own. A major world problem is the lack of understanding (and tolerance) of individuals and groups from other cultures which can lead to choices not to communicate with and ultimately, not to build effective relationships with those who are culturally different. A theme that will persist in the course is to provide opportunities for each student to identify and express their own worldview regarding selected topics such as verbal and nonverbal expressions through messages, cultural dilemmas, dealing with cultural conflict, etc. and then to explore other cultures' world views as expressed by individuals engaged by the student within those cultures.

Developed by: Anne Barrett
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course examines how gender—as it is embedded in individual, interactional, and institutional dimensions of society—gets woven into experiences of our bodies over the entire life course. We’ll explore two major themes: Our bodies bear the imprint of gender inequalities, and efforts to control or contain bodies—as well as resistance to these efforts—reflect gender politics. In exploring these themes, we will cover a wide range of substantive topics spanning the life course, including gendered bodies in preschool, menarche, childbirth, breastfeeding, cosmetic surgery, transsexuals, anorexia, sports, violence, Viagra, and widowhood. Course assignments include collecting and analyzing data for individual and group projects, keeping a sociological observation log, and taking field trips (e.g., art museums, a retirement community, and a toy store).

Developed by: Michael Broyles
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

Of particular importance in our culture is the interpenetration of aural and visual modes of perception. Thanks to the digital revolution, both music and photography have become ubiquitous. To say we live in a visual world is by now axiomatic, but recently the aural dimension in the form of soundscapes has gained greater and greater traction. At the same time the definition of music has expanded exponentially to include unlimited sounds and silences. Yet although the two media seem disparate, artists in both fields have recognized the potential of their interaction. That raises the question, when the two are combined, do we perceive the result as two unique media or a new art-form? The seemingly disparate nature of music and photography not only requires defining the special characteristics of each and how one can impact the other, but also necessitates consideration of scientific issues, such as the twentieth-century revolution of how space and time relate, psychological concepts, such as memory and nostalgia, and aesthetic questions, such as what makes some music and photographs Art, or whether that question is even relevant. This course selects a specific category of sound, music, and a specific visual medium, photography to explore the nature of each and to examine how the aural and visual interact today.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

While biological technology progresses at a dizzying rate the US lags behind many industrial nations in scientific literacy. This produces a disconnect between new scientific discoveries and a society without the proper tools to understand and evaluate their potential. This course will ground students in the scientific principles of some current biotechnology encourage debate regarding the reception of this technology by the media and society.

Developed by: Frank Gunderson
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Ethics Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

Music is powerful in its ability to communicate and persuade. Music is also inherently political. Political commentators, leaders, and organizations (from Aristotle to the Taliban), and politically-oriented musicians (from Bob Marley to Ani DiFranco), have long understood the power of music to question, rally, cajole, pacify, and destroy. Musicians throughout history and across the globe are often the first to speak out against the injustices of the world, and they are the first to be silenced. This course investigates the role music plays worldwide in negotiating, consolidating, and questioning power between powerful macro-reaching political entities (corporations, nation states) and micro-locales (villages, regions, sub-cultures).

Developed by: George Boggs
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

Technology is changing the way we learn and what we need to know. Participants in this course select an area to investigate—a career or academic area—and then get to know disruptive innovations, such as repurposed social networking tools, people are using to gain access to and change their fields. Participants gain a critical understanding of the way knowledge is produced, valued, and networked in academic, career, and other focus areas.

Developed by: Jane Clendinning
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

This course engages ways other than standard Western music notation that music may be represented visually, including tablatures, analytical graphs and diagrams, graphic and text scores, and notation methods for world or popular musics and works in the art music tradition pre- and post-dating the development of standard Western music notation. We will consider the meaning, implications, and purposes of various types of visual music representations, and will create our own visual representations of music for analysis, listening, and performance. This E-series Honors course is not limited to music majors, though they are welcome, and does not require participants to be able to read traditional Western music notation.

Developed by: Mk Haley
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

This course will delve deeply into themed and immersive entertainment and other experiences, providing students an opportunity to see the creative possibilities through different forms of expression. Students will explore Experiential Design, from large-scale highly themed experiences, such as a museum visit or theme park trip, to everyday interactions, such as stop at a coffee shop or gym. Why does magic feel magical? Why do Haunted Houses scare us and why do we want to be scared? What about the DMV could really use a makeover, and why? Class will focus on the necessary collaboration across disciplines for success in the field, the "human" part of all experiences, and will include individual evaluation of a variety of scenarios as well as original proposals / designs of visitor experiences. Facets of storytelling, teamwork, research, human behavior, presentation skills, peer-review, and out of class explorations will all be part of the curriculum.

Developed by: Iain Quinn
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

The central question of the course is “How does Western music relate to contemporary society?” In answering this question students examine the reception of musical performance and contemporary music in the late nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Through this study they also select their own research projects and evaluate the influences of society on music and music on society through the reception of music in the Western canon. Programming trends, performing traditions, the role of criticism, and the perception of the musician in critical literature are interwoven in an interdisciplinary course that engages students from all fields. Students also assess recordings of live performances, which they discuss in class, crossing the line from music appreciation to critical reception. The course also includes attendance at performances of new music which the students assess in the context of their broader studies.

Developed by: John Roberts
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

What shape does a properly led life take? That is the fundamental question we all face. Socrates pursued a particular approach to this question, and philosophers have been pursuing it ever since: To know how we are to live we need to know what we are. Knowing what we are will tells us what sort of life is fit for us. This course explores and evaluates accounts of human nature that key, historically influential philosophers have given to this question and the ways in which their answers are reflected in contemporary debates about what we are.

Developed by: Susan Baldino
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

Museums: Three Promises for Humanity provides an in-depth view of museums and their commitment to learning, equality and social advancement. The seminar traces the development of museums from early traditions through the paradigm shift of the past two decades that has produced uniquely humanistic and socially responsible institutions. Through investigations of museum environments and interaction with museum professionals, the class examines how museums can build a healthy, safe and meaningful future for diverse regional and global communities. Students of all majors will find a stimulating curriculum that can be customized to their academic goals.

Developed by: Douglass Seaton
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

In this seminar you will have the opportunity to read writings about music from different cultural perspectives and in different media—essays, poetry, fiction, drama, journalism. Class discussion and written responses will enable you to share your interpretations of these readings. You will get to develop your own writing skills and musical understanding by writing about your musical experiences in a variety of forms.

Developed by: John Fenstermaker
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

Through the Roaring 20s, Depression, World War II, and the 1950s, Americans read Ernest Hemingway. Following World War I, in Hemingway’s early adulthood, struggles between men and women developed over sexual freedom, economic independence, and political power. Within its broader inquiries, “Understanding Hemingway” will particularly investigate “the confused history of gender relations in America”—about which, cultural critic Rena Sanderson asserts, “one would do well to read Hemingway closely.” Emphasizing Hemingway biography, texts, and audience, this course will recapture in 30 stories and 4 novels numerous critical issues and defining moments in 20th-century America that still shape our culture, ourselves.

Developed by: Aleks Nesic
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

The course is designed to introduce the students to the basic concepts, theories, functions, and behaviors associated with intercultural communication, and is applicable to any major and any student who is interested in increasing their awareness of the world. Throughout the course, students will increase knowledge, understanding, and awareness of different cultures and countries, interpret cultural values and communication strategies used across cultures/countries, and engage in a variety of social, cultural, and experiential activities on campus as they learn how to effectively use intercultural communication in an increasingly interconnected and globalized 21st century. Students will explore questions of world dynamics, interactions, and relationships from multiple perspectives in order to increase their understanding of the growing interdependence of nations and peoples, think critically about the world, and develop a comparative perspective to broad cross-cultural social, economic, and political perspectives.

Developed by: Nari Jeter
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

Relationships are complicated! In this course students will examine how to build and maintain key relationships through understanding themselves and critical relationship process. These key relationships include intimate relationships (dating/marriage partners, children, parents) and professional relationships (clients, coworkers, supervisors). Course content emphasizes the importance of making purposeful choices in building and maintaining personal and professional relationships. Issues of race, ethnicity, and gender are integrated throughout course content, as are positioning these key relationships within the context of social, cultural, political, and economic realities of contemporary life of the 21st century.

Developed by: Christopher Witulski
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course surveys the development of popular music from the early 20th century to the present, examining the music and the cultural, social, economic, technological, and political conditions surrounding that music. This course will widen your comprehension of the times, places, cultural contexts, intellectual debates, and economic conditions that foster (or hinder) artistic innovation.

Developed by: Christopher Witulski
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. As we survey music from around the world, we will emphasize the social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts. The focus, therefore, is on how music works in the world. This leads us to also ask how the world works within music.

Developed by: Michael Wallace
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

The ballroom dance world represents a unique social system, and for this course, will serve as the foundation to touch different aspects of communication. Coursework will include weekly, in-class experiential learning activities ranging from learning basic dance elements to participation in a choreographed group demonstration of the Royal Waltz. The course will focus on three separate emphasis areas: (1) the individual; (2) partnerships, and; (3) groups and social settings. The communication concepts learned through dance in this course will be applied to other social situations and settings.

Developed by: Daniel Maier-Katkin
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

The purpose of this seminar is to advance library research, writing skills, and critical thinking skills among lower division students. Through participation in the seminar and research activities, students will learn to develop and improve their capacity to communicate complex ideas about a topic of their choosing in speech and in writing.

Developed by: Randy Blass
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

This course is intended for all students regardless of major and is designed to foster critical thinking by providing a framework for analysis that will allow students to compare multiple perspectives on historical and contemporary issues in entrepreneurship. This course explores how entrepreneurship in contemporary society is undergoing a fundamental shift towards a powerful new kind of consumer called the "prosumer." Additionally this course seeks to explore how innovation and lean concepts are leading to successful commerce and how that commerce impacts our culture and daily lives. Topics include the process of innovation, the nature of entrepreneurialism, the essence of the Problem-Opportunity-Venture-Sustainment (POVS) model, the lean start-up business model, different kinds of entrepreneurship (commercial, social, scientific, and artistic), and an introduction to competencies that have facilitated success in other entrepreneurs. This course is designed to be thought-provoking and enlightening and will provide students from any discipline with a unique perspective for examining the impact of entrepreneurship throughout history and in our everyday lives.

Developed by: Victor Mesev
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This is a regional geography course studying the island of Great Britain; its changing position from a “great” imperial and industrial power to a “great” financial and cultural leader. Innovation, enterprise, militarization, literature, music and sport from Britain have all helped shape world history, but within Britain there are diverging and converging themes: social class, the north/south divide, urban/rural inequality, London primacy, the monarchy, and Celtic/Anglo-Saxon devolution and conflict. Today Britain is a center for finance and tourism, with rich multicultural mix. It also remains a major player as a mediator in global security, donor of third world aid, trader in the Commonwealth and European Union, and one half of a “special relationship” with the United States.

Developed by: Michelle Laurents
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series, Oral Communication Competency

This course focuses on the speaker’s role and responsibilities in the creation of shared meaning. Participation in this course will help students build and practice essential public speaking skills, and prepare students to engage in responsible persuasion, to use communicative action to create understanding in contentious issues, to exercise personal responsibility in all communication contexts, and to better serve as engines of democracy.

Developed by: Tracie Mahaffey
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

The representations of women and girls in popular culture shape the common view of femininity, girlhood, beauty, and sexuality. Throughout the semester, we will make use of traditional philosophical texts as well as non-traditional materials, such as film, literature, television, and comics, to examine questions of women’s nature, girlhood, beauty, violence, oppression, and sexual agency.

Developed by: Richard Miller
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

This course will acquaint you with the National Parks of the United States and their geographic significance. With the plethora of scientific diversity within the 59 National Parks, the course will cover a range of topics that mold both their physical structure (glaciers, volcanoes, mountains geology, plate tectonics, ground water, climatology, and geomorphology, botany, biology, and ecology) and their usage and maintenance (recreation, anthropology, social & political geography). The course will be conducted with seminars (i.e. minimal lectures) with and lots of class participation. Students will be assigned a National Park to explore, examine, and present to the class. The emphasis and focus of these research presentations will be on a branch of science appropriate to the Park assigned.

Developed by: Marie Charrel-Dennis
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

In “Busting Common Biology Myths”, we will explore areas of biology popularized in the media, politics and global health policies. We will determine strengths and weaknesses of opposing arguments of controversial current biological issues using information found in the scientific literature to support or critique positions. Popular biological issues such as pros and cons of vaccination, the use of stem cells or the dangers of genetically modified organisms will be studied. The overarching goal of the class is to discuss the relative influence of popular arguments in the shaping of global health policies compared with scientific discoveries and their analysis. Topics related to ethics, public policy in biology as well as human health will be covered. Students will learn to engage these real-world problems through lectures, class discussions, team project and oral presentation. Grades will be assigned based on an individual presentation, class participation as well as an essay on a popular representation of a scientific problem.

Developed by: Nora Underwood
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

Food production is arguably humanity's oldest and most central use of ecological science to manage nature. In this course we will explore the basic ecology of agriculture and fisheries and consider how conventional and alternative food-production practices generate and solve ecological problems. We will focus on several major current issues (e.g. genetically modified organisms, pollinator declines, organic agriculture, and fisheries), and for each we will learn the science behind the issue and the social forces shaping the problem. We will learn through discussions of scientific and popular writings, lectures, hands-on and written projects, oral presentations, local speakers and field trips.

Developed by: Carolina Gonzalez
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

There are over 5,000 languages in the world; 40% of them are currently endangered. In addition, 900 artificial languages have so far been created for universal, artistic or entertainment reasons. This course explores how languages are born, the ways and reasons why they change, and the limits of language learning and teaching. It also examines the factors leading to language loss and language death, the reasons why we, as global citizens, should care, and how language specialists and activists attempt to bring dying languages back to life. In this course you will learn the basic tenets and skills of the discipline of linguistics in a collaborative, hands-on setting. As part of a team, you will contribute to the creation of a unique, typologically-consistent artificial language of your own design. From a wider perspective, you will engage with the linguistic variation that exists in our world, and the reasons why it is important to preserve it as much as possible.

Developed by: Eric Chicken
Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: E-Series

Can we understand random events well enough to predict how they will happen in the future? Well enough to maximize a desired goal when the future is unknown? Well enough to determine when two different occurrences are really different? To answer these questions this course introduces and employs two mathematical tools useful in quantifying uncertainty: probability and statistics. The questions posed above will be considered in the context of games of chance, such as card and casino games, and games of skill, such as sporting events.

Developed by: Meegan Kennedy
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

The orphan, the child laborer, and the child adventurer are still figures that rouse debate in our time, but as protagonists they have deep roots in the nineteenth century. This course examines the child protagonist in British fiction from 1830–1914 and in the cultural context that gave rise to it.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Ethics Designations: E-Series

What are rape myths? How are myths about rape portrayed in Western culture? Even a cursory view of literature, art and music beginning with the Greeks to the present day reveals that rape and violence, particularly toward women, are common cultural themes depicted in the many myths, legends, paintings, sculptures and music that have endured. This course identifies cultural representations of rape and violence in literature, music and the arts and discusses current research in rape myth recognition to explain how these areas are interrelated.

Developed by: William Parker
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

Prehistoric animals have captured the public imagination since their first discovery. Many appear so exotic that they challenge our understanding of “how life works.” This course will include an overview of the scientific method, geologic time, fossils and the history of life on earth as a prelude to examining dinosaurs (the “stars” of the course) and their near relatives. Through this course you should develop an understanding of what dinosaurs were (are?), how extinct animals fit into the tapestry of life, and what their demises might tell us about our own future.

Developed by: Jeff Chanton
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

The allocation of food and water for our increasing human population is stressed. Some of the factors creating this stress include climate change, resource depletion, waste, chemical and anti-biotic drug pollution, dysfunctional farm policies, loss of biodiversity and the treatment of animals and workers. This class will provide an overview of the issues involved in food and water security on a planet where a billion people are malnourished, while at the same time another billion are overweight. The class will examine the science of the food production, water quality, soil development and these can be done in a sustainable manner.

Developed by: Milinda Stephenson
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

The question this course addresses is how do female friendship alliances affect the psychological well-being of women? And more importantly, how is this presented in Shakespeare’s plays? To answer that question, students will analyze relationship between friendship groups and the psychology of women in the plays of William Shakespeare through the lens of various psychologists, literary historians, and actors and directors of Shakespeare plays through class discussions, writing assignments and oral presentations.

Developed by: Chris Landbeck
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

This course introduces students to several emerging technologies and briefly examines social, political, or legal issues surrounding the development and use of these technologies in various contexts. Students will engage in structured learning activities to learn the basics about the use of selected technologies from set up to the completion of a basic project.

Developed by: Christina Carroll
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

Taken in conjunction with a Study Abroad course offering. Study your study-abroad country through first-hand encounters and engagement. The coursework gives you the opportunity to study your country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with your own through actively participating in cultural experiences. In addition to weekly reflective assignments, the course will ask you to choose a specific custom to report on, such as looking at race and social class through the football and cricket sporting cultures in England or the significance of the patriarchal society through the courtship dances in Italy.

Please note that IFS2098 is not an E-Series course.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: E-Series

A number of E-Series courses are offered through International Programs, generally under the course number IFS2099. For individual course descriptions and designations, please click here. For more information, please visit the International Programs website.

Dresden
  • Music and the Barbarian: Civility, Censorship, and Control (Ethics)
Florence
  • On-line Democracy to World Governance (Social Sciences)
London
  • IFS2064: Art Music in Contemporary Society (Humanities and Cultural Practice)
  • Great English Composers and the World Wars (Humanities and Cultural Practice)
  • Music, Culture, and Imperialism in and around Great Britain (Humanities and Cultural Practice, Cross-Cultural Studies (X))
  • Music, History, and Culture (Humanities and Cultural Practice)
  • Please Please Me: Anglo-American Youth Culture (Social Sciences)
  • Understanding Religion: Understanding People (Ethics)
  • Who Do the British Think They Are? (History)
Panama City, Republic of Panama
  • Biodiversity and the Expansion of Peri-Urban Spaces (Social Sciences)
  • Finding Ecofriendly Solutions for Global Sustainable Economic Growth (Natural Sciences)
  • Human Sexual Behavior: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (Social Sciences, Cross-Cultural Studies (X))
  • Panama's Religion Melting Pot (Humanities and Cultural Practice, Cross-Cultural Studies (X))
  • Physics of Sustainability (Natural Sciences)
Valencia
  • Art as Propaganda (Humanities and Cultural Practice)
  • Festivals: Artisanship, Satire, and Fire (Humanities and Cultural Practice)
  • Lorca in America, Hemingway in Spain (Humanities and Cultural Practice)

Developed by: Charles Brewer
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course is an overview of the uses and meanings of music in the development of film during the past 130 years. It examines the many different ways that the question of “why music” has been significant and answered by directors, composers, and musicians during this period and especially how music has come to impact the film experience since the introduction of sound. Through the critical examination of selected commercial, independent, avant garde, and international films, music's essential role in cinema will be evaluated.

Developed by: Frederick Davis
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

Cultures of Medicine asks, “What is the relationship between humans and disease?” The History of Medicine and Disease explores the relationship between various groups of humans and the microbes they encounter. This interdisciplinary course in medicine and culture explores numerous diverse perspectives on medicine and disease: history, ethics, literature, art, and, of course, science. Through a variety of case studies in medicine and disease, students will develop skills of analysis, synthesis, reflection, and exposition.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

If one chooses to go to a local multiplex in America, it’s most likely that half the films showing are adaptations. In this course, students read original texts in different genres (eg. mystery, children’s fantasy novel, play, choreopoem, film, short story) and then watch and analyze films based on those texts. In doing so, students explore two major questions: Why are cinematic adaptations so prolific in America?” and “Why do we like (or hate) film adaptations of texts we’ve already read”?

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

Documentary is increasingly serving as long form journalism, filling a gap left by understaffed newsrooms and sound-bite journalism. The struggle over questions of truth, objectivity and social activism were present in the earliest documentary films and continue to be important themes today. Through lecture, discussion, hands-on experience and film screenings, we will explore the past, present and future of the documentary film tradition.

Developed by: Erin Ingvalson
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

Nearly all humans have language, but no non-human animals do. This course will discuss how having language influences other cognitive processes, such as vision or memory.

Developed by: David Houle
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

This online course introduces the study of evolution as it applies to the practice of medicine. We will investigate what constitutes scientific evidence, how to use evidence, the evidence concerning biological evolution, and the implications of evolution for the practice of medicine.

Developed by: John Schwenkler
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

This is a course about self-knowledge -- specifically, what does it mean to "know oneself", and what makes the knowledge of oneself different from knowledge of other sorts. We will read a range of philosophical and literary works that explore these questions, and students will write papers and prepare a creative work to showcase their own thinking about them.

Developed by: Brad Gomez
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

In this E-series honors seminar, we will explore the factors that structure individuals' attitudes towards politics and how the distribution of public opinion on major issues affects government. More specifically, the course has been designed to provide students a critical examination of the psychology of political attitude formation, the opportunity to gather and analyze—both independently and as a group—data about citizens' political beliefs, and an empirical evaluation of government responsiveness toward citizens' demands. In short, we will investigate issues that are critical to the performance of democracy.

Developed by: Joab Corey
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

This course is designed to help students develop the ability to make sound decisions for getting the most out their limited resources. This includes learning the basics of cost-benefit analysis and other fundamental economic principles that are necessary for getting the most out of everyday decisions as well as budgeting and investing strategies for maximizing the return on one's financial portfolio. This course will also provide students with entrepreneurial strategies for starting and developing business ideas.

Developed by: Will Hanley
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice, Computer Competency

This class brings together microhistory, urban history, and digital history. We will collect comprehensive data about the events in a single city in a single year, through close reading of an English-language daily newspaper published in that city. We will gather much of this data using digital methods. We then work together to represent those events in a website that will employ a variety of digital communication tools.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Developed by: David Gilbert
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

One of the biggest challenges to future generations is our newfound ability to read and manipulate our own genomes, and to alter the course of human development. Choosing the sex or genetic composition of our children, human cloning, rebuilding defective organs and tissues from stem cells, and altering our own genetic constitution are all within the realm of the near future. This class is intended to help you understand the science behind major issues that are likely to evolve into increasingly important moral, political, and public policy decisions in your lifetime.

Developed by: Paul Marty
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

What are the unintended and unanticipated social consequences of implementing new information technologies in the 21st century? Does our increased reliance on, and trust in, advanced information systems pose dangers to life and limb? Do we risk losing the recorded knowledge of humanity as we produce more data? Are we becoming too dependent on the information technologies we created to make our lives easier? This course will explore the pros and cons of information technology in our everyday lives, and examine how we can identify and mitigate against risk factors that lead to information technology disasters.

Developed by: Steven Marks
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

While biological technology progresses at a dizzying rate the US lags behind many industrial nations in scientific literacy. This produces a disconnect between new scientific discoveries and a society without the proper tools to understand and evaluate their potential. This course will ground students in the scientific principles of some current biotechnology encourage debate regarding the reception of this technology by the media and society.

Developed by: Richard Emmerson
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

This course studies how the Apocalypse——the end of the world——is represented in the arts from the Early Christian and medieval periods to the present. Students will analyze book and manuscript illustrations, films, paintings, plays, religious texts, and visionary poems to determine why and how people think the world will end and how they expressed those expectations in powerful works of art. The way apocalypticism influenced historical events, such as the Crusades, and religious polemics, such as the Reformation, will be examined, as well as how apocalypticism has been transformed by contemporary concerns with nuclear warfare and environmental disaster.

Developed by: Joab Corey
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

This course is designed to help students understand current economic issues so that they can become more informed citizens and voters. The student will learn the basics of economic thinking and how markets and the political process work, and then apply these concepts to current economic issues such as minimum wage, legalization of drugs, trade restrictions, and fiscal and monetary policy during an economic crisis.

Developed by: Candace Ward
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

Living in Florida, we are all familiar with tourists and tourism. We are less familiar, perhaps, with the history of tourism, of the relationship between tourism and colonialism and imperialism, of the impacts of tourism on communities and peoples where tourists visit, and of the broader impact of tourism at individual, regional, national, and global levels. Through an exploration of travel writing, journalism, literature, film, and music, we will explore questions—sometimes uncomfortable questions—about the good, the bad, and the ugly of tourism and tourists.

Developed by: Michael Trammell
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

We will study the intersections between communication, business, intercultural business, sustainability, social responsibility, ethics, and professional leadership. One facet of the course will explore the communication issues and challenges that managers of businesses and other organizations face. Additionally, we will discuss sustainability issues through the lens of Permaculture and Transition Town philosophies, tackling topics such as “peak oil,” permaculture design, local and alternative currencies, and the “triple bottom line” ideal; these topics will also be examined via a global perspective.

Developed by: Kathleen Clark
Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: E-Series

In this course, students will develop mathematical knowledge through problem posing, problem solving, extending problems, and developing profound understanding of fundamental mathematics concepts. The course is designed to engage participants in inquiry about mathematics, driven by their own interests and curiosity in mathematics. The course is also designed to give students authentic experiences of “doing mathematics” – and to instill dispositions towards mathematics as a product of human thought, as opposed to determining a single, correct answer.

Developed by: David Rasmussen
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

The purpose of this seminar is to advance library research and writing skills among freshmen and sophomores. Each student will be working throughout the semester on a major term paper, and all of the assignments in the class will be aimed at developing the quality of that paper. Throughout the semester students will focus on writing and making in-class presentations about how they are undertaking the research for their term papers, and what they are finding. At the end of the semester each student will have authored a 15-page paper with an abstract, extensive footnotes and thorough bibliography.

Students will have considerable latitude in selecting a topic for their research on the general notion of how “rights” evolve in the U.S. There are many examples of the changing saliency of rights over time. Perspectives on the rights of women, racial and ethnic minorities are obvious examples as are issues of product safety and the rights of workers. Contemporary environmental concerns were unimaginable a century ago, LBGT rights were not part of the policy landscape a few decades ago and issues related to obesity are emerging. Research can focus on historical developments, contemporary debates, or factors such as economic development, cultural change, entrenched interests, interest groups or legislative change that affected the emergence of new rights.

Developed by: Victor Mesev
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

This course explores where sports are played, in which competitive capacity, and within which levels of fairness. It will investigate how sport and attitudes to sport are unevenly distributed around the world; where money drives competition, and where culture dictates ‘acceptable’ levels of competition. Students will evaluate the ethics and fairness of gamesmanship and sportsmanship, and how ‘success’ in sport can have various definitions, including personal satisfaction, tribal coherence, and externalities linked with ‘psychic income.’

Developed by: Laura Lee
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

Cinema has been the most significant form of visual culture for the past century: it both makes worlds visible and stages encounters with the world. As cinema is transformed by new technologies in an increasingly globalized context, what does this entail for world cultures? Can “global” cinema still provide access to the world beyond “Hollyworld,” and provide local communities with meaningful social experiences?

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

In this course, students will experience an alternative to Hollywood Cinema. Through the silver screen, they will discover the Arab world by focusing on film as a key medium to reflect social and political attitudes, as well as cultural values. Primary emphasis is placed on understanding cultural identities, but students are also trained to analyze the riches of Arab cinema, as the product of its cultural and political history, and in terms of its use to declare artistic manifestos. Western images of the Arab world are largely shaped by Hollywood, with its depictions of politics and culture in the modern Middle East. These depictions often occur within the scope of Orientalist discourse, showing the dichotomy of the Islamic East and the Christian West, as stated by Edward Said, discernible through visual art forms and various literature projecting the Eastern World as exotic, backwards, and dangerous. However, Arab cinema has been prolific in producing films that often differ from Hollywood’s lens on issues facing Arab societies. If it is crucial to study how Hollywood represents the Arab other; it is more important to understand how Arabs represent themselves and others in powerful images of cultural production. Students will watch selected movies from Egypt, Palestine, Lebanon, Syria, Morocco, Algeria, Libya, and Yemen, and a movie from Hollywood. By watching Arab movies in an informed and critical manner, and reading related texts with a better understanding of Western biases, these prejudices may be confronted and contested to celebrate cultural diversity around the globe. The course provides a window into 20th and 21st century Arab societies, and challenges Hollywood images of the Middle East.

Developed by: Lisa Weinberg
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

A wide range of theories have been posited to explain the Achievement Gap in Education, while educational programs have been developed and strategies have been employed to close it. However, the educational achievement gap persists and its effects are far reaching. This course will empower students to critically examine the Achievement Gap in Education, engage structural and cultural theories/explanations, explore synthesis and envision new solutions.

Developed by: Allen Romano
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

How do we know the past? How might technology help or hinder us in knowing the past better? Beginning with the earliest forms of writing, poetry, and ancient memory arts (mnemotechnics) and then extending to the modern day shift to computers and digital memorialization, we ask both what has been gained and what has been lost in these technological turns. What roles have writing, speech, art, and ritual played in fostering memory? What role have they played in forgetting?

Developed by: Laurel Fulkerson
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course examines attitudes towards sexuality in ancient Greek and Roman culture, and the influence of Greek and Roman norms on later cultures and periods, including especially our own; sexual identities play a large, and increasing, role in political life. We will examine some of the theoretical debates over the issue of whether homosexuality (and heterosexuality) are “essentialist” or “constructionist,” and also a number of important cases, some heard by the U.S. Supreme court, in which “the Greeks” serve to justify, or condemn, modern sexual practices – with what rationale is not always clear. Examining how ancient models of sexuality differ from our own is here a means toward thinking about the larger question of responsible consumption of the past.

Developed by: Lisa Weinberg
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

The subculture of Hip Hop has received attention from the media and the academic community for both bringing awareness to issues of inequality and reinforcing negative stereotypes. This course challenges students to examine themes and messages expressed within the subculture of Hip Hop through the application of major sociological perspectives and theories. This course examines the reciprocal relationship between Hip Hop culture and the broader American society, through engagement with scholarly literature, examination of empirical evidence and execution of student research projects.

Developed by: Andy Opel
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

From climate change to species extinction, our planet is facing large scale environmental change. These ecological concerns are often in direct conflict with modern industrialization. At the same time that our scientific understanding of the global environment is increasingly detailed and complex, we are progressively dependent on mediated information for our opinions and public policy decisions. News and entertainment media play a significant role in negotiating the tension between ecological sustainability and rising consumption and resource depletion.

Developed by: Mia Lustria
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

Rapid advances in information and communication technologies (ICTs) are transforming healthcare in profound ways. From websites to social media, mobile apps and wearable devices, eHealth is changing the ways health consumers seek and communicate health information and inceasingly, how patients mange their own healthcare. This course explores the use of emerging technologies for health information seeking health promotion and disease prevention, and for supporting the treatment and management of chronic illnesses. It promotes an interdisciplinary, user-centered and evidence-based approach for developing health IT systems to support health consumers. Students will learn how to assess users’ information needs, competencies, and health behaviors in order to develop accessible, useful, and effective solutions. They will also study issues and concerns influencing adoption of these technologies at different levels. The concepts and theories discussed in this class are drawn from various disciplines including communication, information studies, human computer-interaction, medicine, psychology and public health.

Developed by: Birgit Maier-Katkin
Course Area: Ethics
Humanities and Cultural Practice Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

Almost seventy years after the collapse of the Third Reich, Nazi Crimes Against Humanity still shape the discourse in German society as well as in the international community. This course examines how filmmakers reveal a multiplicity of voices and memories that seek to represent, remember and come to terms with Nazi crimes. The course draws on the multiple perspectives of victims, perpetrators, bystanders, resisters, helpers as well as subsequent generations to examine how members of these groups bear witness and contribute to the cultural memory in German society. Through the cinematic lens, this course examines how cultural memory is created after these horrific events and how filmmakers reveal a multiplicity of voices and reflect on the indelible mark of the Nazi past in Germany.

Developed by: Laura Keller
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

In this seminar, we will explore the very broad topic of "sustainability". Most students probably will enter the course with some knowledge of global environmental degradation—what fills our landfills, water quality, global warming, and rainforest defoliation. The class will quickly move from such environmental issues to understanding the three "e"s of sustainability—ecology, equity, and equality—and to investigating ways to integrate sustainability into building techniques, infrastructural details, and social structures. The goal is not to persuade students to recycle, but to help identify what will have to change so that everyone recycles, or so that our ways of life change to make is less trash in the first place. Grades will be based on two papers, homework assignments, and student participation in class readings and discussions, Earth Day at FSU, and the design and implementation of a class project. This course should appeal to non-biologists with interests in sustainability as well as to biologists with a wide variety of non-biological interests.

Developed by: Kathleen Erndl
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

How is India "imagined" through popular cinema? India is the world's largest democracy, one of the world's oldest continuous civilizations, and also has the world's largest film industry. In this course, we examine Indian identity, cultural, and religious values as expressed in film. The popular cinema produced in Bombay (now Mumbai), dubbed "Bollywood," will predominate, spanning the period from Indian and Pakistani Independence (1947) to the 21st century. Topics for discussion will include love and separation, gender roles, relationships between divine and human, sensuality and renunciation, caste and class identity, the state, diaspora, the quest for ultimate truth….and, of course, music, dance, and stardom! Films will be screened weekly in Hindi with English subtitles. No previous knowledge of Indian culture or cinema is assumed.

Developed by: Christian Weber
Course Area: Ethics
Humanities and Cultural Practice Designations: E-Series

We are using technology every day in so many different ways, but rarely do we consider and reflect on the longer term consequences of certain technologies on our human condition. Every miraculous task that a technological invention performs to facilitate and ease our existence deprives us, in turn, also of some of our actual skills or potential capabilities. This course will investigate the intricate relationship between the human existence and technology from both theoretical (theological, anthropological, ethical, sociological) and a practical perspective by analyzing works of literature and film and by critically assessing the actual or potential effects of certain technologies on human lives.

Developed by: Sonya Cronin
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

What do popular series like Hunger Games, ender’s Game, and the Dune Trilogy have to do with religion and philosophy? This course positions the contemporary literary genre of science fiction and dystopian literature as part of a long-standing historical conversation about the fate, providence, and the nature of evil using works by such authors as Orson Scott Card, Suzanne Collings, Veronica Roth, Frank Herbert, and Walter Miller to illuminate these persistent philosophical and theological questions. The course traces the development of these ideas from ancient literature to the present by drawing on interdisciplinary sources such as history, social psychology, philosophy, religion, and literature and the arts.

Developed by: Sumner Twiss
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

What are the purported goals, justifications, and limits—legal, moral, and political—of torture practices, both historical and contemporary? How have the recent and on-going debates about the legitimacy of torture in America been shaped by moral and religious perspectives? In this e-series course, students will learn to think critically about a range of topics that include: history of torture; torture, pain, and “unmaking” the world; social psychological accounts of conditions making torture possible; genealogy of modern torture; democracy and recent proposals to legalize torture; comparative moral and religious perspectives on torture and its critique; and prospects for the abolition of torture. Course materials are interdisciplinary, drawing from history, social psychology, law (especially international human rights law), philosophy and religion, and the arts.

Developed by: Aleks Nesic
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts, theories and frameworks in the of conflict analysis and resolution. Students will learn how to identify conflict drivers and dynamics, and apply different levels and methods of conflict analysis. The course aims to engage students in inquiring persistent questions about the world dynamics, interactions and relationships that lead to conflict and peace. Throughout the course students will apply critical thinking and examinations of case studies utilizing interdisciplinary thinking and methods. Students will explore conflict resolution from multiple perspectives in order to increase their understanding of the growing interdependence of nations and their societies, and develop a comparative perspective to cross-cultural social, political and economic issues associated with global conflicts.

Developed by: Mark Pietralunga
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course will explore the cultural history of Italian cuisine from its ancient roots to contemporary times. We will examine how culinary practices and the culture of food are essential elements of Italian identity. Students will experience the historical evolution of food and discover how gastronomy is interwoven into all aspects of Italian social life and culture. Through a mixture of first-hand experience and interpretative analysis (study of food manuals, written assignments, and class discussion), the students' epicurean travels will include regional explorations into cuisine, the craftsman-like nature of food and wine, and the ethics of food and consumerism as depicted in the Slow Food Revolution.

Developed by: Lisa Lyons
Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: E-Series

This natural science E-series course will explore the impact of changing technology on circadian rhythms and sleep patterns and the consequences to human health. Topics covered will include: a historical perspective on work schedules and sleep; global comparison of modern work schedules and sleep patterns; the effects of sleep deprivation on human health and performance; the effects of shift work and jet-lag on the circadian clock, and the consequences of circadian dysfunction on human health.

Developed by: George Williamson
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

Throughout the twenty-first century, the fears and realities of terrorism have left a deep mark on political life, the institutions of law and governance, and the quality of everyday life in the United States, Europe, and the rest of the world. This course provides a historical perspective on modern terrorism, examining its emergence and development from the late eighteenth to the early twenty-first centuries, responses to it on the part of the state, intellectuals, and the public, and its impact on literature, philosophy, and popular culture.

Developed by: Elwood Carlson
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series, Computer Competency

Every generation, from Boomers to Millenials, experiences a different social world even while occupying the same physical landscape. Original personal explorations of census samples spanning the 20th century bring to life abstract theories about generational contrasts, conflicts and interactions, making each of us aware of our own generation and how it compares to and interacts with those before and after us.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Developed by: Kathryn Cashin
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

Why are movies so popular? Is it because they make us think, or because they allow us to not think? This course examines the impact of American Cinema on social relations and on the reproduction of power. By watching movies with a better understanding of their biases and prejudices we may confront them and contest them in order to celebrate the cultural diversity of the United States.

Developed by: Don Latham
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

Many careers in the information age involve writing technical documents, making technical presentations, and conducting research in order to develop these documents and presentations. This course will provide a framework for understanding the contextual, ethical, and cultural dimensions of technical communication, and will offer ample opportunities to engage in writing, speaking, and peer editing.

Developed by: M. Katie Flanagan
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

This course exposes students to management topics with the sport industry including topics relating to professional, collegiate, interscholastic, youth, and community sport. Within and across levels of sport, course focuses on ethical, legal, financial, and sociological aspects of the sport industry.

Developed by: Jeannine Turner
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

How do you motivate yourself and others to attain high performance goals and accomplishments? The purpose of this course is to examine theories and research that focus on aspects of self-motivation as well as motivating groups. The course will cover topics in the domains of educational psychology, leadership studies, sport psychology, counseling psychology, and social psychology. The overall intent of the course is to help students understand underlying mechanisms of becoming, and being, leaders within their domains.

Developed by: Jonathan Grant
Course Area: History
Designations: E-Series

This course addresses the real world problem of global trafficking in weapons, drugs, and humans. Such trafficking causes tremendous harm in today's world. Employing a variety of approaches from criminology, law, economics, and International Relations, this interdisciplinary History course examines how and why trafficking became embedded in the modern world, and also considers efforts to control or eliminate trafficking in the modern era.

Developed by: Martin Kavka
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

This course is a survey of responses to the attempted extermination of European Jews between 1933–45, often called the Holocaust or the Shoah, a Hebrew word meaning “disaster.” It is not a historical survey of the means by which this extermination was attempted; instead, this course is a survey of literary, theological, and cinematic responses to the Holocaust. The course’s primary aim is to study the ways in which one represents this traumatic event, the techniques by which one bears witness to it, and the extent to which this event challenges the foundational narratives of the Jewish and Christian traditions.

Developed by: David Johnson
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

This is a course about adaptation, medievalism and the “Reel Middle Ages.” We will examine a body of medieval texts in their literary and cultural contexts, analyzing their reception and re- interpretation through the contemporary medium of film. We will learn about the theory and practice of film adaptation in general, and the transformation of medieval texts to film in particular. The complexity of our modern period’s medieval heritage requires much effort on our part to appreciate. This course attempts to facilitate a deeper appreciation and understanding of 20th and 21st century medievalism in one of our most influential media.

Developed by: Tim Kinney
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

This course will use real-world business problems as a format to enable students to read and comprehend, analyze in depth, and formulate solutions creatively. Reading, writing and presenting skills will be targeted for development.

Developed by: Aleks Nesic
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is designed for students enrolled in the Global Citizenship Certificate program. It is the final required course in which students will engage in analyzing real world problems and/or persistent issue in order to complete the final Certificate requirements. The course is discussion based, also ample opportunities for group work and sustained project/paper assignment where students will have an opportunity to synthesize the knowledge and competencies gained through their participation in the Certificate, continue to develop their global competencies and become globally ready graduates.

Developed by: Geoffrey Thomas
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

This course is an anthropological consideration of ownership and ethical perspectives from a four field approach. We will not take the meaning of these terms for granted, but rather will investigate how ownership is defined in academia (intellectual) and within the specific subfields of anthropology (cultural, archaeology, physical, and linguistics). This includes the intersection of culturally specific beliefs about artifacts, cultural history, and human remains with how tensions between politics and academia play out in various ways around the world. We will also examine the ethical challenges of anthropological practices and considerations towards traditional societies with in an increasingly globalized world. Turning this critical eye on the history and current issues in anthropology itself will enable us to understand more sharply how knowledge is formed and what its ethical and political stakes are.

Developed by: Katie Flanagan
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

The purpose of this course is to draw attention to various ethical issues and moral dilemmas that arise when playing, watching, consuming, and facilitating sport. Athletes, coaches, fans, and sport administrators face ethical issues at all levels of competition (professional, collegiate, Olympic, youth) and throughout the sport industry. The course examines such issues over time alongside historical, social, and cultural contexts that impact the ethical issues. The course provides a foundation of ethical perspectives that relate to sport such as the nature of sport, fundamentals of a game/competition, and the quest for excellence. Issues such as doping, athlete recruitment, gambling, amateurism, genetic engineering, and violence within and outside the playing field are discussed and analyzed. Students will practice identifying moral dilemmas in sport, consider options, apply different ethical positions to the dilemma, and reflect on potential consequences.

Developed by: Michael Broyles
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

A thick square face with heavy eyebrows, long hair out of control, and a deep scowl, Beethoven’s image is almost as familiar as da-da-da-dum. Beethoven’s persona and music seem everywhere in the American consciousness, far beyond the concert hall, in popular songs and videos, in film and television commercials. This seminar will examine the ways Beethoven has been viewed, interpreted, and used in American culture, especially in popular culture, in films, in music from swing to rap, on television, and in modern art. We will examine these issues with the question in mind, what does this tell us about American culture and society. We will also look at Beethoven’s presence in some of the more esoteric byways of American history, such as Transcendentalism and spiritualism. No prior knowledge of music is required for this course.

Developed by: Chalet Comellas
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series, Scholarship in Practice

In what ways can artists attempt to affect change through the use of environmental art & design? What are notable strategies used by artists/designers in this field? How can critical thinking be used to expand on issues of sustainable art practices? Art that focuses on sustainability comes in many forms. It reflects a series of ideas about social and ecological issues facing the world today. These projects don't intend solve environmental problems but point to potential solutions and raise awareness. This class provides an introduction into the theories and creative processes that propel environmental art and design. We will explore a wide range of creative media, methods, and themes used by visual artists & designers that address the environment. By analyzing, discussing and writing about environmental art and design, you can develop an enhanced awareness of the complexities we are faced with globally and gather perspectives on the ways artists attempt to affect change.

Developed by: Piers Rawling
Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: E-Series

Why are some arguments good and others bad? How can you tell the difference? In this course you will address these questions, and thereby enhance your ability to distinguish between good and bad reasoning, think critically about any subject matter, and produce cogent arguments concerning it.

Developed by: Mark LeBar
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

The battle between good and evil within us is an ancient human story, and one that never ceases to engage us. We think about what it is to be human by thinking about what the forces within us that can make us into what we hope, or fear, to become. This course will explore questions about what it means to be human — Can we become more or less good, or more or less evil? Are some of us more or less human than others? — from an interdisciplinary and historical perspective.

Developed by: Iain Quinn
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

The course examines the relationship of music and literature through three lenses: the perception of musicians in works of literature; the use of literature in musical works; critical literature about music. Readings include texts of Robert Browning, T. S. Eliot, Matthew Gallaway, Eduard Hanslick, Thomas Hardy, Thomas Mann, Tim Page, Alex Ross, John Ruskin, George Bernard Shaw, and Virgil Thomson.

Developed by: Tracie Mahaffey
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

Consent is a foundational aspect of the ethics of human society. Contracts, medical care, marriage—the successful implementation of relations like these assume that individuals have the capacity to consent to various activities. But what is consent? What is required for consent? Does “yes” always mean yes? This course will provide a critical philosophical examination of consent and the role of consent in everyday life. In the first half of the course, we will examine theoretical perspectives on the nature and moral force of consent, and its relationship to key ethical concepts such as autonomy and paternalism. In the second half of the course, we will examine issues of consent in a broad range of contexts, including sexual relationships, contracts, markets in human organs, political legitimacy, medicine, and research.

Developed by: Miranda Waggoner
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: E-Series

Human reproduction is typically thought of as simply a natural phenomenon, yet reproduction is as profoundly social as it is merely biological. Studying the multiple aspects of reproduction offers an analytic window onto the intersection between private issues and public concerns, between individual bodies and broader patterns of social configurations. In this class, we will examine the social dimensions of reproduction, focusing particularly on what makes reproduction “political”. In doing so, we will examine how reproduction interfaces with the politics of women’s health, men’s health, child health, family formation, public policy discourse, reproductive technologies, and reproductive practices, among other topics. Furthermore, we will scrutinize how the politics of reproduction shape and are shaped by inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexuality, and citizenship, and we will consider cultural, political, and economic forces that influence reproductive experiences and discourses. In each class, we will address historical context, sociopolitical trends, and contemporary debates regarding specific themes and topics related to reproductive politics. Course material and discussions will draw from varied perspectives and interdisciplinary resources, including sociology, demography, anthropology, history, medicine, and public health. Although the course material focuses mostly on U.S. reproductive politics, we will consider other societies for comparison.

Developed by: Matthew Goff
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

In this course we will examine traditions regarding demons, the Antichrist and Satan in the Bible, Judaism and Christianity. Biblical and ancient non-biblical texts that describe these figures will be examined in their historical contexts. Traditions regarding Satan and other evil personages will be traced historically so that students will have a sense of how our understanding of these figures changed over time. The focus of the class will be on the development of evil entities in the ancient world, but there will also be consideration of demons and related figures in the contemporary world.

Developed by: Angela Schwenkler
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

This course is a philosophical investigation into the relationship between ethics and art. We will focus on the following questions: Can art contain ethical content, in a way that uniquely furthers the philosophical investigation of ethics? Can some works of art help us develop ethical awareness? Does all art by its nature have ethical content, or can art be amoral?

We will let art speak for itself first: our inquiry into these questions will begin with a close study of works of art form literature, film, the visual arts, and music. Only in the last third of the course will we turn to explicit philosophical theorizing about the art works we have studied; at point, we will consider what Plato, Nietzsche, Kant, and Martha Nussbaum have to say about the relationship between ethics and art. Students will write a short in-class essay in response to each day’s assigned reading, two longer papers that address questions raised during the semester, and a final essay or creative work (such as a short story, play, film, or work of music or visual art) engaging in some way with the themes of the course. The course will introduce students to some important philosophical concepts and methods of philosophical analysis, and emphasize how philosophical inquiry can be relevant to everyday life.

Developed by: Chalet Comellas
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: E-Series

In what ways do contemporary artists reflect our culture and society? Today, artists work in a globally influenced and culturally diverse world, and the artworks they produce are created through advancing technologies and evolving studio practices. Much like a mirror, contemporary art has the ability to reflect a unique perspective within a particular point in time, and it is important to look at art through this lens because it can embody a variety of perspectives on identity, values, and beliefs. This course identifies the cultural landscape that artists are currently exploring and discusses a variety of artists’ works to explore and critically analyze the ways that art can function as a mirror of contemporary society.

Developed by: Trevor Luke
Course Area: Ethics
History Designations: E-Series

What can the ancient Romans, so often stereotyped as immoral and bloodthirsty, teach us about ethical living and engagement with others in a diverse global community where customs, values, and religious beliefs regularly clash? The Romans engaged in complex ethical discussions informed by moral anecdotes, law, religion, and philosophy. This material helped them navigate the problems of living in and governing a culturally and ethnically diverse global empire. In this course we will learn about the different aspects of Roman culture that shaped the Roman sense of right and wrong and influenced their response to ethical conundrums. We will apply this rich and sometimes contradictory material to modern questions, and we will consider how the Romans and their non-Roman subjects dealt with conflicts over ethical issues.

Developed by: Virginia Lewis
Course Area: Ethics
Designations: E-Series

This course explores human attitudes toward non-human animals in ancient and modern culture. Students will read a sampling of ancient and modern literature and philosophical thought focused on our topic. Each week we will explore a new set of issues to examine some of the intersections and divergences between ancient worldviews and our own. We will engage with a range of themes over the course of the semester, including beliefs about animal consciousness, human-animal social relationships, the use of animals in literature and art, and the ethics of animal treatment.

Throughout the semester, we will continue to explore a series of questions: What did the ancient Greeks and Romans think about animals, and how do we know what they thought? How did their views differ from ours? Are our attitudes and behaviors toward animals innate or learned? How do literary works reflect our conceptions about ancient attitudes? To what extent does the genre of a work influence ancient and modern attitudes toward animals? What are the ethical issues surrounding the farming, hunting, and eating of animals? To engage with these questions, we will be reading ancient works alongside works by contemporary ethicists, sociologists, and novelists. There are no prerequisites for this course; anyone interested in human attitudes toward animals is welcome.

Developed by: Anthony Rhine
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Ethics Designations: E-Series

This course explores the ethics of modern social media as a vehicle for marketing and promoting people as artificial characters in a type of electronic performance, and the nature of truth in that promotion. This course is structured around the development of a final report and presentation that will address the following questions: How does social media affect how humans interact? How is art used for social change, promotion, and marketing? What are the real interactions in social media, and how are they promoted? What are the ethical issues in promoting oneself in social media? What is truthful in social media, and how do people respond to the truth?

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

The required capstone course in the major represents Scholarship in Practice that will enable students to demonstrate their ability to integrate coursework, knowledge, skills, and experiential learning with broad mastery of knowledge and skills across the curriculum to enhance further career advancement and employability. Students are required to submit two major written documents by the end of the course—the Capstone project report and an analytical essay based upon experiences and interactions with healthcare providers, volunteers, patients, or clients in their experiential venues.

Developed by: Lisa Waxman
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice

This course focuses on the impact of design on the human experience. It is a gateway experience in which students will explore the nature of design, creativity, and problem solving. The course will introduce some of the major theories from the design disciplines of interiors, architecture, landscape architecture, and products design, and provide students with an awareness, understanding, and enthusiasm for design and its impact on our lives.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course is an advanced computer-aided design class. Students increase their knowledge of 3D AutoCAD, learn the basics of Autodesk Viz software, and receive an overview of PhotoShop.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Developed by: Kenan Fishburne
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

An introduction to the global practice of interior design with in-depth study of business practices, entry level job search, business ethics, legalities, strategic management, estimating and budgeting based on specifications, and project management. Students will be required to communicate their creative and business ideas by creating verbal presentations and producing clear, correct writing through multiple written ethics reviews and in class exercises.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This internship course is designed for on the job experiential learning between the student and an internship provider, vetted by the Department of Interior Design. Credit hours will be based on contact hours with the provider location. On the job learning will provide a bridge from academic classwork to work in the field which is essential for a well-rounded education. Course participation does not guarantee a job but may provide important networking for eventual job search.

To supplement mandated hours on the job, the student will be sharing the internship experience with course instructors and fellow interning classmates through an on-line blog format during the semester. In addition, the student will be writing a pre-internship perception paper as well as a post-internship reflection paper on the internship experience.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

International Affairs Internship is designed for students to gain real world experience through on-the-job-practice. Interns can expect to gain valuable work experience, develop professional skills, cultivate valuable contacts and investigate career options. The Internship allows students to receive academic credit for internship placement in approved agencies and organizations. To qualify for an internship under International Affairs the internship must include an international component and must be approved by the program director (Dr. Lee Metcalf) or by the internships supervisor (Dr. Na’ama Nagar). Once students secure an internship they can register for internship credits, the number of credits depends on the number of hours per week.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course introduces students to the core questions and concerns of international affairs. This course surveys the many distinct academic disciplines that together contribute to the development of an interdisciplinary understanding of the international system. The course examines how each of these disciplines understands the international system, the questions it raises, and its strengths and weaknesses. In addition, the course provides an introduction to many of the global issues of interest to international affairs majors, including terrorism, democracy, and globalization. At the end of this course, students have the skills and knowledge required to construct their own specialized plan of study in international affairs.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking

It is clear that computers can almost imitate human-like intelligence. The evidence of this is everywhere around us: movie, book and music recommendation systems; programs that allow us to experiment on models of the earth; medical imaging software that can detect tumors that humans can’t see. This course asks how computers have gained this ability. The answer includes our detecting patterns in nature, but also patterns in the very way we think. This course will present popular computational methods shaping our lives, and try to explain the ideas that make them work. Students will practice logical thinking by working with versions of these computational methods that affect society and science. Knowledge of a computer programming language is not required nor will it be taught.

Developed by:
Course Area: Natural Science

This course covers global environmental change, scientific and human dimensions, and international public policy implications.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course introduces the student to the science of computations. Topics cover algorithms for standard problems in computational science, as well as the basics of an object-oriented programming language, to facilitate the students' implementation of algorithms.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Computer Competency, Natural Science Lab

In this course, students learn appropriate scientific research methods for several types of research questions. Using the inquiry method of learning, they develop a research question and an experiment to answer it, and then use statistical techniques to analyze their resulting data.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

Students who graduate with a bachelor’s degree in the sciences are expected to have learned valuable quantitative, scientific, and analytical skills in the classroom and in the laboratory. But to land a job, and more importantly, to succeed while on the job, they also need to be able to communicate clearly and convincingly. This course concentrates on the primary modes of formal communication in the workplace—reports, proposals, and presentations.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This practicum allows students to work individually with a faculty member throughout the semester and meet with the instructor periodically to make progress reports. Written reports and an oral presentation of work are required. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours, with a maximum of only three semester hour credits allowed to be applied to the Computational Science degree.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Developed by: Noyan Ilk
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

Advances in computing technologies have greatly enhanced our ability to collect and store large amounts of data in real-time. Unfortunately, corporations today are said to be data rich but information poor. Data analytics and mining techniques can help companies gather information and discover knowledge from these massive data sets. This course will discuss the most important data analytics and mining techniques to support data-driven decision making and help corporations acquire knowledge from large data sets. Specifically, it will introduce methods such as clustering, classification, association rule mining, etc. through a hands-on approach using specialized software.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course provides students with learning opportunities in the organizational management information systems environments beyond those available in existing MIS courses.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Developed by: Irene Zanini-Cordi
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course helps students perfect their oral skills in spoken Italian. It brings them from an intermediate to high level of oral proficiency enabling them to express themselves in common, everyday situations and to conduct sophisticated cultural conversations. In order to enroll in ITA4410, you must have completed the three-semester series of Italian courses (ITA1120, ITA1121, ITA2200) or its equivalent with a C- or better. You also need to have already taken ITA2240, Italian Conversation and, preferably, ITA3420 Grammar and Composition. If you have not taken a university-level course in Italian, and you have some knowledge of the language, you must take the Italian placement test. The instructor also reserves the right to ask students who do not have an intermediate level of proficiency to withdraw from the class.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course stresses the morphological and syntactical order of Italian by means of extensive drill in controlled and free composition.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Developed by: Elizabeth Coggeshall
Course Area: Ethics

In the Middle Ages, ethics and literature were fundamentally inseparable disciplines. To read well meant to think deeply about how best to live. This was certainly true for Dante, whose Inferno represents a poetic compendium of ethical quandaries faced by his medieval readers: extramarital affairs, overindulgence in food and drink, suicide and despair, corruption in Church and/or State, etc. These quandaries are not exclusive to medieval actors; each of the misdeeds Dante describes has equivalents in contemporary American culture. The poem presents these quandaries as deficiencies of will: we may know the correct ways to act, but bad patterns of thought deceive us into following our desires, contrary to what we know to be good for us, for our friends, and for our communities at large.

In this course, we will approach the Inferno as a diagnostic manual for pathologies of the human will. We will ask the following questions: what ethical problems does Dante’s poem seek to diagnose? How do those ethical problems find their expressions in contemporary life? And, finally, how does good, careful reading offer a therapeutic solution? We will seek answers to these questions in a close and careful analysis of Dante’s poem, which we will treat not as a literary artifact of a bygone era, but as a living document that speaks as much to its own time as it does to ours.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

After a general overview of Italian history and culture, this course will introduce students to a sample of novels, plays, paintings and movies that present key aspects of Italian culture and its achievements. Caravaggio, Artemisia Gentileschi, Giacomo Leopardi, Anna Banti, Primo Levi and Pier Paolo Pasolini. Taught in English.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is an introduction to artistic, intellectual, social, and political trends in Italy from pre-Roman times to the Age of Romanticism with specific reference to Medieval and Renaissance Italy as a center of culture in Europe. Offered in English.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course will examine the cultural developments and socio-political changes in modern Italy. Among the topics to be treated are the following: the Unification of Italy and the formation of a nation and the question of national identity; Fascism’s influence on the national culture; the importance of the “language question” in Italian culture and society; World War II; the Italian miracle of the post-war period; the North/South divide; the Mafia; American influence on Italy; Catholicism and the role of the Church; the “Made in Italy” label in fashion and design; and the social phenomenon of immigration into Italy of people coming from Eastern Europe, Africa, and Asia. Taught in English.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines the literary and cinematic contributions that Italian Americans have made during the past century. The course is designed to assist students in exploring ways in which Italian and American cultures have combined to form a distinctive ethnic culture.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Tornatore’s Cinema Paradiso and its success with the international public could be taken as a double metaphor for Italian people’s love affair with the movies and for the admiration Italian films and directors have inspired abroad. But what made Italian cinema so distinctive and popular? We will try to answer this by viewing and discussing several representative Italian movies from the last 100 years. Throughout this course students will have the opportunity of watching a number of extraordinary films. Together, we will review them as both artistic achievements in their own right and as expressions of a specific place and time. We will also discuss how the technical and visual aspects of filmmaking construct cinematographic stories and learn how to analyze single frames and scenes. At the end of this course, students not only will have acquired an appreciation for Italian cinema and expanded their knowledge of Italian culture, but they also will have honed their skills at film analysis and acquired a vocabulary that will enable them to think and write critically about visual artifacts.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course prepares students at the high-intermediate level in Japanese. Students develop oral communication skills that enable them to perform appropriately in Japanese in various authentic, real-life situations.

Developed by: Laura Lee
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course will trace the history of Japanese cinema and introduce essential concepts and vocabulary of film analysis. Moving from the earliest days of motion pictures in Japan to recent animation and horror films we will study key developments in the nation’s film production, including general trends, movements and genres, and the contributions of its most famous directors, in order to explore relationships between film and culture. Emphasis will be put on questions of film form and style, which we will pursue in relation to wider aesthetic, cultural, and political concerns. No prior knowledge of Japanese language is expected. All films will be screened with English subtitles.

Developed by: Laura Lee
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course explores Japanese popular culture from a range of perspectives. Students will investigate cultures of reception, shifting demographics and key developments in multiple media, and various forms of leisure and modes of consumption, to consider their relationship to history, culture, and lived experience.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

The focus of this course is the Japanese Tea Ceremony, or chanoyu. It introduces the world of the first medieval tea-masters and follows the transformation of chanoyu (lit. ‘water for tea’) into a popular pastime, a performance art, a get-together of art connoisseurs, and a religious path for samurai warriors, merchants, and artists in Early Modern Japan. It also explores the metamorphosis of chanoyu under 20th century nationalisms and during the postwar economic boom, with particular attention to issues of patronage, gender, and social class. Each session will cover a different aspect of chanoyu, focusing on a rigorous analysis of historical texts (primary sources) and of modern studies and current research (secondary sources). Taught in English.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: History
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is a cross-cultural history of Latin America focusing on women, Native Americans, African-Americans, mestizos, and mulattoes in historical context. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

Developed by: Kathy Guthrie
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

LDR 2101 is an interactive, dynamic theory to practice course focused on learning leadership knowledge, skills and values in individual and partnership contexts. The course includes literature, theory and leadership experiences that will provide a foundation for subsequent courses in the Undergraduate Certificate in Leadership Studies. This course is designed to inspire, teach and engage students in the process of leadership learning. Students will learn leadership theory and come to understand their unique role in leadership in classes, their academic discipline, and within our larger society. Although the course is focused on learning and understanding leadership theory, students will have an opportunity to develop skills necessary to be effective in the leadership process, and practice these skills within their community. The course will be highly interactive with student participation as a critical component to the learning process.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

Peer Leadership will develop potential campus student leaders and improve overall peer leadership efficacy. It will give students a deeper understanding of themselves and appreciation for the diversity of others. This course also serves as an opportunity to provide all student leaders with direct training and preparation for campus leadership and mentoring roles.

Developed by: Kathy Guthrie
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course is designed to inspire, teach, and engage students in the process of learning leadership within the context of working with groups and communities. This course helps students develop the skills necessary in order to be effective in the leadership process and to practice these skills within their community. The course is highly interactive, with student participation and outside class involvement as critical components to the learning process.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course enables students to develop their intellectual, interpersonal, and social skills through their experiences as members in organizations. This course is designed to prepare students for leadership roles and challenges they face in their organizations, on campus, and in the community. The course is highly interactive with student participation and outside class involvement as critical components to the learning process.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course introduces students to theoretical frameworks in the field of social justice. Through these theories, the notions of privilege, oppression, power and difference are explored. Attention is given to specific social justice issues related to gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, ability, age and class. Students examine social justice in the context of leadership and come to understand their unique role in creating social change on campus, in their academic discipline, and within our larger society.

Developed by: Kathy Guthrie
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course explores the complex intersections of gender and the intricacies of enacting leadership. Students will consider gender as a socially constructed concept and discuss the historical inequities in which this construct has developed and how this has influenced their understanding and enactment of leadership. This course considers the experiences of women, trans*, genderqueer, and men leaders, as well as concepts of gender expression and the intersectionality of identities as influencers on leadership access and practice. To address these perspectives, the course reviews research from a variety of disciplines, including education, social psychology, sociology, economics, and management and organizational science.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course is a theory-to-practice, interactive and identity-based leadership course discussing and analyzing components of Latinx Leadership Development. (Latinx is a gender-neutral term for Latino/a.) This course explores the historical and cultural aspects of Latinx culture and how it intertwines with leadership development, learning, and practice. Students in this course will learn the core tenets of Latinx Leadership Development, aspects of Latinx Leadership Development in U.S. society, local community, and culture. Students will have the opportunity to reflect individually and in groups on how concepts of Latinx Leadership Development are prevalent in their personal and professional lives. The course will be highly interactive with student participation, group discussion, group activities, and opportunities for personal reflection.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course is designed to introduce students to the concept of leadership and action related to sustainability. It looks at the interconnectedness and complexity of the three pillars of sustainability (environment, economic, and social) as well as discusses the development of the leadership skills needed to create social change. In conjunction with class discussions and readings, students develop a personal sustainability plan to help align passion and values into active practice.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

The course initiates a thoughtful consideration of the nature of leadership as depicted in film. Film provides unique insights to investigate character and motive, as well as culture, allowing us to access meaning and significance through theoretical, analytic and dialogic inquiry. Reflection, introspection, and personal engagement aimed toward a richly layered encounter with the lives of leaders contributes to the formation of a more enduring and authentic leadership response to personal, organizational, and global complexities.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This advanced undergraduate leadership course examines the change process and prepares leaders who are effective in working with individuals, groups, and organizations in leading and managing change. This is an interactive theory-to-practice course, focused on leadership as a change process.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This experiential-based course offers participants an opportunity to put into practice the knowledge, theory, and skills they have learned in previous courses in the Certification program. Students select and create an experience, complete an experiential learning contract for the course, and do extensive reflection on their experience throughout the course.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This final course in the Certificate in Leadership Studies builds upon the leadership literature, theory and experience foundation created in the previous certificate courses. This course provides opportunities for analysis of student's experiential opportunity, advanced theory to practice work, anddevelopment of personal leadership theory and integrated learning plan.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course offers practical information and activities designed to familiarize students with theories, organizational structures, and issues/trends/ challenges of the student affairs profession. It is designed to provide st udents an opportunity to gain knowledge in the theory and practical application of student affairs, with an emphasis placed on leadership development,problem solving, and career exploration.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course introduces the concepts, principles and best practices for leading and supervising professional employees of recreation, sport, and leisure service organizations.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course will introduce the student to the variety of ways computer applications and other technologies are used in the planning, design, marketing and evaluation of events. Examples of applications and technologies to be addressed include technology platforms, software, cloud-based systems: Search Engine Optimization, mobile applications, event registration and transaction/payment systems, social media, etc.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course is a full-time internship experience in a recreation, tourism and events organization under the supervision under the supervision of a professional in that field.

Developed by: Carolina González
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

There are over 7,000 languages in the world, of which 40% are considered endangered. What do all of them have in common, and how do they vary? What do we stand to lose with language death? These are some of the questions that we will examine in Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics, a course that will allow you to appreciate language diversity, discuss the issues involved in language loss, and provide you with the analytical skills to examine and interpret linguistic data. Our approach will be discussion-based and hands-on, featuring numerous examples and data sets in order to uncover phonological (sound), morphological (word) and syntactic (sentence) structures that illuminate the possible patterns of the world’s languages.

Although there is no pre-requisite for this course, a background in linguistics is recommended (preferably through prior completion of LIN 3041 or IFS 2083). A basic knowledge of the following linguistic concepts is assumed: (i) phonetic classification and transcription; (ii) allophonic vs. phonemic distribution; (iii) morphological structure; (iv) syntactic analysis.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

Digital storytelling uses virtual spaces and digital technologies to support human oral storytelling. This course helps students build their presentation skills through an understanding of the role of storytelling in the context of information environments such as the family, library, school, business, and social media. Students will learn how to use stories to understand these environments better and to communicate, teach, learn, lead, and advocate when operating within them. Students will learn traditional stories, write original stories, and present stories in class exercises and assignments. Students will also learn to critique story presentations and to provide constructive feedback to other developing storytellers.

Course Area: Social Science

This course examines major issues related to living in the "information society," including information literacy, information security, identity theft, privacy, intellectual property, and information ethics. Students gain skills in searching the Web, electronic databases, and print resources. The three broad areas covered by the course are personal information management, academic information, and career/professional information.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

Offers practical hands-on experience with forms and practices of technical and professional writing, including documentation, correspondence, audience analysis, writing for social media, evaluation, and review. Emphasizes clear, concise, and effective writing in information technology settings, both within organizations and for user services.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Statewide Core

This course introduces students to key terminology, concepts, and methodologies for the study of complex literature. This course will provide a groundwork in literary types for nonmajors and is also strongly recommended as preparation for upper-level (3000 or 4000-level) coursework in the field. By learning important, shared language that literary scholars use for talking about literary texts, students in this course will be able to apply these languages, terms, themes and concepts in the construction of their own arguments, the analysis of texts, and methods of inquiry both in this course and others.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

The course builds a working vocabulary of literary analysis and will cover such narrative elements as: point of view, characterization, setting, theme, and symbolism. Midterm, final, one annotated bibliography, two 5-­7 page papers, one 10-­12 page research paper.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

An introduction to the art of reading and analyzing poetry. Covers the essential elements of poetry such as line, stanza, meter, rhyme, and figurative language. Midterm, final, quizzes, two 5-­7 page papers.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course covers poetry, fiction, drama from WWI to the present. For beginning students.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course will cover literature from “Third World” countries in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean that were formerly colonies of England, and where the medium of expression is still English. Midterm, term paper, and final exam.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), Upper Division Writing Competency

This course introduces students to the critical reading of short stories dating from the nineteenth through the twenty-first century. This course aims to teach students to identify tone, narration, form, theme, characterization, and other formal aspects of short fiction. Students will be encouraged to formulate their own interpretation of the works we read based on their developing ability to recognize the decisions each author has made in constructing the text.

Students will be introduced to a variety of meaningful social and cultural contexts for multiple reading units and asked to read the stories in each unit with an awareness of the social and cultural situations informing our understanding of the story’s thematic meanings. A central goal of this course is to not only have students understand how the cultural and social milieu in which writers are writing within (or are revisiting) are shaping their work, but in turn, how we as readers are being shaped by these authors’ vision of social, cultural, and historical events. An examination of any theme in a short story is not just a literary investigation, but also an examination of human nature. Concepts such as characterization, setting, symbolism, and so forth will be the platform from which we will explore. This course will also introduce to some key terms in contemporary literary criticism that you would encounter most frequently in your reading of the commentaries or secondary sources, including multiculturalism, formalist criticism, and gender criticism. These concepts will provide you with some useful perspectives to consider in your critical thinking and writing about literature.

Note – This course is currently listed in the Student Central system as LIT 2020 Introduction to the Short Story for the Spring 2018 semester. Students wishing to enroll in this course should enroll in a section of LIT 2020.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

A study of various texts representing major developments in modern writings for the theatre from O’Neill, Pirandello, Miller, and Theatre of the Absurd to the present. Tests and critical papers.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

In this course, we will study texts that consider women's roles in society. This version of the course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?

Developed by: Meegan Kennedy
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Ethics Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

Courses in Literature and Medicine study how literary texts address questions in medical ethics and public health. In Liteature and Medicine: Diseases and Debates, students will read a selection of essays, fiction, poetry, and other texts from the Victorian period to examine a series of spirited debates from that time. These controversies helped shape the landscape of medical professional ethics as we now understand it. Each topic we examine will be paired with a set of readings that address similar concerns in the contemporary setting. This course builds skills in critical reading and writing, cultural practice, and ethics.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course has a recommended background of two years of high school algebra. On basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105. Review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course may be taken concurrently with MAC 1114. The course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course credit must be reduced to four hours for students who took MAC 1141 and received a grade of "C-" or better. This is a one-semester course encompassing the topics of MAC 1140 (Pre-calculus Algebra) and MAC 1114 (Analytic Trigonometry). See the topics for MAC 1140 and MAC 1114.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course is not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better. Limits, continuity, first and high derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course covers techniques of integration; applications of integration; series and Taylor series; differential equations. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course covers functions of several variables and their graphical representations; vectors; partial derivatives and gradients; optimization; multiple integration; polar, spherical, and cylindrical coordinate systems; curves; vector fields; line integrals; flux integrals; divergence theorem and Stokes' theorem. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

The College of Business Internship Program is designed for students to gain real world experience in their respective field through on-the-job-practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional and the Internship Programs Office.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course is a marketing internship designed for marketing majors who want to gain real world experience in the marketing field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty adviser and the internship director.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course covers the structure of the atmosphere; weather processes and weather systems, including climatic processes. Credit may not be received in this course if student has already received credit in 2000-level or higher MET courses.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course covers the solution of meteorological problems using computers.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Developed by: Jon Ahlquist
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course includes practice in preparing and presenting weathercasts for radio and television.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course covers synoptic calculation and four-dimensional analysis of weather systems.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathmatics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course has a recommended background of two years of high school algebra. Topics will include financial mathematics; linear and exponential growth; numbers and number systems; history of mathematics; elementary number theory; voting techniques; graph theory; game theory; geometry; and computer applications.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

This course is a review and application of media business practices and legal requirements involved in the conception and production of media content on electronic, online and new media platforms. It follows a lecture and seminar style to engage you actively in research and study of the key issues, theories, events, documents, processes, and agents of change in historical and contemporary law and policy governing selected media activities and new electronic media. Activities and assignments place emphasis on discovery of the underlying assumptions, intentions, and implications of evolving and converging law and policy processes. This course does not give you an exhaustive review of communication law, but focuses instead on developing your analysis and insight into key topics concerning law, policy, and governance of new media.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course surveys the ethical principles, standards, and problems in the practice of journalism, advertising, and/or public relations.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course is an analysis of the process of change, particularly from the standpoint of how communication is used in the introduction, spread, and adoption of new ideas, behaviors, and products within a society.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

The course is an examination of various international and national media systems and the elements which determine the type of media currently operating throughout the world. We look at comparative media systems, in the context of international communication patterns, media flows and uses, industries, and institutions. The range of issues that we will consider varies from a broad overview of industry and institutional trends and themes to a closer examination of media industries, institutions and policies, firm strategies, and implications for communications and cultural practices. In each area, however, we will be using country, regional, and global examples to identify the key developments and large issues at stake, and to build a framework for analysis and approaches to research, rather than merely acquire information. For majors in the School of Communication.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

In this course, students discuss staff organization, functions, and processes, analyze counseling responsibilities and methods, and apply leadership and problem solving principles to complex case studies/simulations.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course consists of preparing and presenting a formal recital of works composed by the student.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course introduces development of choral, verbal, and non-verbal communication skills; conducting skills; and knowledge of choral literature.

Note – To satisfy the Oral Communication Competency requirement, both MUE3491 and MUE3495 must be taken.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course examines communication in the conducting of instrumental music in public schools. It emphasizes verbal and non-verbal rehearsal techniques and the application of pedagogical skills in the classroom.

Note – To satisfy the Oral Communication Competency requirement, both MUE3493 and MUE3496 must be taken.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

Note – To satisfy the Oral Communication Competency requirement, both MUE3491 and MUE3495 must be taken.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

Note – To satisfy the Oral Communication Competency requirement, both MUE3493 and MUE3496 must be taken.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course orients, teaches, and coordinates students who wish to volunteer for Arts in Medicine practica at Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare. The purpose of the course is to allow each student to use her/his particular talents to benefit Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare patients, families, and staff. For each hour of academic credit, students are required to complete two hours per week of volunteer service throughout the semester.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course combines reading, discussion, and hands-on projects to achieve an understanding of how computers work and how they can be incorporated effectively in the music classroom from K-12.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

One semester resident internship as a student teacher in approved public schools to provide pre-service music education teachers progressive instructional responsibilities and opportunities for the application of content and professional knowledge as a music educator in Florida public schools.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

A survey of great music literature of the 19th and 20th centuries, the master composers who created this literature, their music, its relation to the other arts and historical events of the times, and the milieu in which this music literature was created. Three equal tests; extra credit can be obtained by writing critiques of concerts, operas, musicals, etc. For non­-majors.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course surveys the development of popular music in America from the early 20th century to the present with a focus on the cultural, social, economic, technological, and political conditions surrounding that music. Music as we know, hear, and love it is not created outside of historical and societal influences or pressures. This course will widen your comprehension of the times, places, cultural contexts, intellectual debates, and economic conditions that foster (or hinder) artistic innovation. It will also change the way you hear music throughout your life.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. While we will be looking at musical traditions from several geographic regions, the focus of the course is not exclusive to traditional music per se. Rather, we will analyze tradition as a constantly evolving and transformative entity that nurtures and sustains core cultural values. As we survey music from around the world, we will emphasize the social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. While we will be looking at musical traditions from several geographic regions, the focus of the course is not exclusive to traditional music per se. Rather, we will analyze tradition as a constantly evolving and transformative entity that nurtures and sustains core cultural values. As we survey music from around the world, we will emphasize the social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts. The course is open to music majors and there are no prerequisites.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course will present a survey of the musics of North American minority groups, with an emphasis on Native American, African-American, Latin American, Asian, Jewish, and certain Euro-American traditions. While we will mostly focus on the traditional musics of the groups we study, we will do so with an understanding that these cultures and their musics are constantly changing, adapting, and evolving. In order to better understand and appreciate these musics as they exist within culture, we will also examine a host of other issues, such as: social contexts, religion, location, nationalism, dance and drama, group identity, mass media, the Internet, issues of ownership/authenticity, class structure, the music business, and power relations.

Course Area: History
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

The history of music from Antiquity through the period of Rationalism. This course includes the relationships of music to concurrent events and movements, as well as historical developments in musical institutions, genres, and styles in response to historical contexts and historical change. Required of music majors.

Course Area: History
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

The history of music from the Enlightenment to the present. This course includes the relationships of music to concurrent events and movements, as well as historical developments in musical institutions, genres, and styles in response to historical contexts and historical change. Required of music majors.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Statewide Core

An introduction to music as a manifestation of human culture, as an expressive art form, and as an intellectual discipline. Development of knowledge of a variety of significant musical repertoire, skills for perceptive listening, and the ability to respond to musical expression with critical insight.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice

A survey of core repertoire of Western music. In addition to the works themselves, the course introduces the broad periods of Western music history, and it develops a systematic approach to the analysis of musical style.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

A workshop-style course for upper-class Music Theatre majors, where all the various components of their preceding class work can be integrated. The focus is on Advanced Acting for Music Theatre and Audition Techniques.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course surveys computer technology in music, including hardware, software, computer-based instruction, multimedia and internet.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course culminates in a formal student project, which may include a recital, pedagogical study, written document, or other experience relevant to the student's course of study.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

A practical, analytical, and performance-oriented application of the fundamental materials of music theory to song composition; the course culminates in the composition and performance of an original song, in correct musical notation. Not open to students who have successfully completed one (1) or more semesters of music theory.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

To develop a working knowledge of the materials and structures of tonal music through reading, listening, partwriting, model composition, and music analysis, and to be able to demonstrate mastery of these materials orally and in writing.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice

This course offers students the opportunity to develop a working knowledge of the materials and structures of tonal and post-tonal music through reading, listening, model composition, and music analysis, and to be able to demonstrate mastery of these materials orally and in writing.

Developed by: Jane Clendinning
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

Analytical and music theoretical study of popular music, including consideration of form, melody and harmony, meter and rhythm, timbre and production aspects, and recorded vs. live performance elements.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course focuses on the applications of music therapy in all fields of health, corrections, and special education.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course offers a six-month resident internship in an affiliated, approved, clinical center.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course consists of preparing and presenting a formal recital of significant works in an applied music area. Specific course numbers are as follows:

  • MVB4971 – Brass
  • MVK4971 – Keyboard
  • MVP4971 – Percussion
  • MVS4971 – Strings
  • MVV4971 – Voice
  • MVW4971 – Woodwinds

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course is a comparative analytical approach to the study of communication, current problems, issues, health care beliefs, values, and practices of different systems and cultural norms as they affect health care practices which conflict with ethnic or cultural communication related to standards and value systems.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course uses a broad-based approach to substance abuse and the effects on health, family, and the profession; identifying groups at risk, preven tion activities, and help approaches.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course examines various communication patterns basic to individual and group relationships. Course emphasizes the development of interactive skills paramount to effective communication with individuals and groups involved with health care issues. It provides an opportunity for the validation of oral communication and a range of public speaking experiences especially related to health care.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency, Computer Competency

The course introduces the student to major systematic approaches to the development and improvement of nursing practice including evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and research. Inquiry through evidence-based approaches and research will be discussed. Focus will be placed on the processes of finding, reading, appraising and synthesizing evidence to improve practice.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course occurs following the completion of all required nursing courses. This capstone clinical experience requires the student to demonstrate competencies consistent with program outcomes. Synthesis of core values, core competencies, core knowledge, cultural humility, and role development is expected. The student collaborates with the faculty and the preceptor in choosing the care setting as well as in planning and organizing the learning experience, to facilitate a successful transition into the profession.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Natural Science

This course studies the structure and motion of the ocean and its environs, properties, populations, and energy budget. Not intended for upper-division science or mathematics majors. Upper-division science or mathematics majors are encouraged instead to take OCE 4008.

Course Area: Ethics

This introductory course in public administration studies the management of large-scale government bureaucracies including organization, career systems, and financing. It also focuses on the role of bureaucracies in modern society in the forumalation and implementation of public policy.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course focuses on Ancient Greek philosophy from its beginnings to the work of one of its greatest practitioners. Questions posed include: What is there? What can I know about it? What should I do?

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course focuses on philosophy from the "Master of Those Who Knew" (Aristotle) through the end of the ancient world and the dominance of Christianity. Topics include: the structure of the World-Order, God, Man's place.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is a critical study of the theories of 17th- and 18th-century Western philosophers through a careful examination of representative texts from both the empiricist and rationalist traditions.

Course Area: Ethics
Designations: Statewide Core

This course introduces some of the central problems in philosophy. Students also learn how to construct and criticize arguments, and develop their own philosophical positions.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking

Reasoning and Critical Thinking is designed to provide students with an understanding of the logical foundation of arguments and decisions. The course emphasizes acquisition of the skills necessary to construct clear, persuasive arguments. Students will practice using reasoning to support conclusions and decisions. Students will also evaluate reasons, data, arguments and conclusions presented in a variety of everyday circumstances.

Developed by:
Course Area: Ethics

This course focuses on philosophical issues raised by environmental problems and the sciences designed to resolve them. The scope of the course includes methodological and conceptual issues in environmental science. The course also analyzes the historical development of environmental perspectives and the ethical theories that have been generated by these approaches.

Course Area: Ethics

Most of us have views about what is right and wrong when it comes to specific issues, such as abortion or the death penalty, but we do not always have views about what is right and wrong in general. That is, we may not have a coherent theory of what is morally relevant and why. And so our views run the risk of being mere prejudices. This is a course that draws on ethical theories to explore the major ethical issues that one faces as one makes decisions about the kinds of activities to engage in and the kind of life to lead. In this course, students examine a number of moral theories and discuss specific ethical issues in light of these theories to see how well their views stand up to critical scrutiny.

Course Area: Ethics
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is an examination of the philosophical foundations of bioethical theory and an exploration of the trenchant issues in contemporary bioethics with a concentration on discussions of race, gender, and vulnerable populations (e.g. the poor, immigrants). The course employs tools of ethical theory, philosophical analysis, and analytic writing to examine a number of moral issues arising in health care including justice in health care, experimentation and research on human subjects, reproductive technology, aging, organ donation, and euthanasia. Throughout the course we examine assumptions about rights, persons, and ethical priniciples at work in medical decisions.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course is a variable-content seminar for majors to do in-depth work in selected philosophical topics/areas and to practice writing a substantive philosophical paper. Registration is restricted to Philosophy majors. Exceptions may be made with permission of the instructor, if there is space available.

Course Area: Ethics
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

In this course we will study selected contemporary philosophical, literary, and journalistic discussions of questions regarding race, class, and gender with a particular emphasis on the status of these discussions in the United States. We will survey theoretical accounts of the concepts of race, class, and gender, as well as their interrelatedness, and we will examine their application to various contemporary social issues.

Course Area: Ethics
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is an introduction to some of the main issues in political philosophy: the justification of political authority, role of law, political obligation, neocolonialism, disobedience, revolution, rights, the appropriate ends of government, patterns of distribution and justice.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is an examination of the contemporary philosophical debates about sex and sexual relationships. Topics include, but are not limited to how to define sex, the distinction between "normal" and "abnormal" sex, sexual exploitation and objectification, sexual consent, the relationship between sex and the meaning of life, and the nature of romantic love.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Statewide Core

PHY1020 is a Liberal Studies course for the non-science major that contains the essential physics that students need in order to understand today’s core science and technology issues, and to become the next generation of world leaders. The course empowers students possessing any level of scientific background with the tools they need to make informed decisions and to argue their views persuasively with anyone—expert or otherwise.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab

he Laboratory course is designed to accompany or follow the 1020 Lecture course. Although the lab material will generally follow the lecture, some topics may be treated earlier or later in the lab syllabus, so it is essential to read over the assigned lab materials carefully before coming to the lab. The PHY1020L is designed to satisfy the liberal studies science laboratory requirement for non-science majors.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab, Statewide Core

General Physics A with Lab is designed to provide you with an understanding of how and why things move, so we will cover kinematics, forces, energy, momentum, oscillations, and a touch of thermodynamics. It is intended for physical science majors and engineers and to be taken as a sequence with General Physics B (PHY 2049C) and Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101). Completing Modern Physics entitles you to a minor in physics. Calculus is used in this course.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab, Statewide Core

General Physics B is a calculus-based introduction to electricity and magnetism and optics for physical science majors.

Course Area: Natural Science
Designations: Natural Science Lab, Statewide Core

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence for life-sciences students and is intended to provide a general knowledge of the basic concepts of physics relating to mechanics, energy, gravity, rotational motion, fluids, heat, thermodynamics, vibrations and waves. Physics is based on problem solving and this class involves both solving word problems and performing laboratory exercises. The level of mathematical skill necessary to complete this course is a strong proficiency with algebra (especially word problems) and trigonometric functions; calculus is not used.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course consists of instruction and practice in oral communications for physicists. Students choose physics topics in consultation with instructor and present them to the class.

Developed by: Irinel Chiorescu
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

This course focuses on experiments in optics, modern physics, and electricity and magnetism. The emphasis is on the development of experimental technique, assessment of the validity of experimental data, and the development of skill in the written presentation of results.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course consists of projects in theoretical or experimental physics arranged in advance between the student and a member of the teaching faculty of the physics department.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course introduces students to the use of computers to computationally solve physics problems.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This course investigates how the national government is structured and how the American political system operates. Covers the philosophical and constuitutional foundations of American government, the branches of the nationalt government, the mechanisms by which citizens are connected to their gover nment, and the policy outputs of government.

Course Area: Natural Science

All behavior, both normal and abnormal, including perceptions, thoughts, movements, and complex social behaviors are correlated with brain and nervous system activity. This course will help students understand basic nervous system mechanisms that underlie behavior and how systematic observation and experimentation are involved in constructing our understanding of these mechanisms. This course also will convey an appreciation for utilizing critical thinking and scientific knowledge when making important decisions. (Cannot be taken after PSB3004C)

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Statewide Core

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior, the brain, and mental processes. General Psychology is a broad overview course covering important psychological principles and findings within the major subfields of psychology, and the basic scientific methods employed. A "bio-psycho-social" approach is emphasized throughout so that all behaviors (including how we think, feel, and act) are discussed in terms of biological, psychological, and social determinants and consequences.

Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency, Computer Competency

This course is an introduction to philosophical and methodological issues in the empirical study of psychology. Laboratory portion includes running simple experiments, analyzing data, and interpreting the results.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course consists of participation in a group research project on a selected topic as designated by the directing professor.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

Psychology Internships allow students to take an internship experience for course credit. Before registering for the course, students will need to arrange the internship experience. The psychology advising office can provide guidance on the process of setting up the internship.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the techniques and skills necessary for professional public relations writing. The materials and information presented and the techniques practiced will support the development of professional writing skills for public relations. Course material is provided by lecture, class discussion, reading and studying the texts, guest speakers and assigned tasks. For majors only.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course consists of practical application of classroom principles in public relation settings.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course prepares pre-service teachers to teach beginning reading, targeting the needs of a wide range of learners, including those of varying abilities and from diverse cultures. The content addresses research-based strategies, materials, technology, assessment, classroom management and collaboration with other professionals and parents.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course introduces pre-service teachers to the role of literacy in the content areas. Students develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to meet the literacy needs of students. Readings, discussions, and writing opportunities challenge students to examine the acquisition of primary and secondary discourses, the tensions students experience as they do so, and the strategies that support acquisition of disciplinary literacies.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real-world experience in the real estate field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director. S/U grade only.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is an introduction to the academic study of world religions. It is designed to acquaint students with religious traditions practiced throughout the world. Particular attention will be given to the historical development of various religious traditions, their role(s) in world history, and their relevance in current events.

Course Area: History
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines the scope and nature of religious movements, trends, and figures in American religious history, with an emphasis on the role that religious groups and institutions have played in conceptions of America and formations of American identity.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

The word “Bible” is derived from the Greek word “biblia” which means “books.” While revered as a single book, the Bible is a collection of many texts that were composed by different authors at different times for different reasons. This course is an introduction to the critical study of this assorted literature and the world in which it was produced. We will examine individual texts of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament within their historical contexts while taking into consideration other methodological approaches such as literary criticism and theology.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is a critical introduction to the literature of the New Testament and to the academic approaches to it. The distinctive concerns and literary features of individual texts will be studied int he contexts of the historical development of the early Christian church, ancient Judaism, and the wider Greco-Roman world. Emphasis throughout will fall on the variety of interpretations of the Christian message as Christians encountered new social circumstances and theological challenges. The course emphasizes careful reading of ancient Christian texts using a variety of methods of scholarly analysis.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

Overview of religions in the South Asian cultural region, emphasizing Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, and Islam. The historical and cultural contexts of these traditions are explored with particular attention to sacred texts, mysticism, religious experience, and religious practice. This course is also an introduction to the academic study of religion. No previous background is required. Students will gain familiarity with the basic concepts of the religious traditions of South Asia and develop interpretive and analytical skills in the academic study of religion.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is an introduction to the history, thought and practice of religion in China, Korea, and Japan. Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and popular religious traditions from ancient through modern times are covered.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course explores the relationship between religion and popular culture through the critical study of several highly successful series of fantasy novels authored during the twentieth century. Through a wide range of fantasy literature—such as works by J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, J. K. Rowling, and Philip Pullman—students will reflect on the nature of the difference between the “religious” and the “secular.” Further, the course also introduces students to problems in literary history including the development of literary genres, questions of authorial intent, and reflection on how historical context influences literary production.

Course Area: History

This course examines selected topics in American religious history.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice

This course covers interpretation of religious phenomena by the major social theorists of modern times. The course is divided into two parts: 1) the psychology of religion and 2) the sociology of religion.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course examines the impact of ideas about gender on religious beliefs and practices and the impact of religious beliefs and practices on ideas about gender in a cross-cultural context. Through various readings, writing exercises, and class discussions, the course aims to sharpen students’ critical thinking skills in regards to the role of gender in religious studies. The course focuses on theoretical questions about the nature of gender and religion, as well as practical issues related to power, embodiment, marriage, and the language of religious faith and practice.

Course Area: Ethics
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course examines the relationship between race, ethnicity, and religious beliefs in a cross-cultural context. Through various readings, writing exercises, and class discussions, the course aims to sharpen students’ critical thinking skills concerning the roles of race and/or ethnicity in religious studies. The course focuses on theoretical questions related to the intersection of race, ethnicity, and religious, as well as practical issues related to the moral and ethical implications of power, colonialism, law, religious institutions, and politics.

Developed by: Amanda Porterfield
Course Area: History

This course will explore the psychological aspects of religious life in five different religious traditions in the United States. The main purpose of the course is to critically examine the cultural experiences and social structures that have shaped psychological approaches to religion in the US in the 20th and 21st centuries. The course will use historical methods for analyzing data to evaluate causal arguments, assertions, and assumptions involved in different accounts of religious feeling and mental states. In addition to studying distinctive expressions of mind and emotion characteristic of several different religious traditions in the US, the course will consider how Protestant and Jewish ways of thinking about mind and emotion strongly affected the development of secular psychology in the US. The course will also consider how religious traditions in the US have resisted secular psychology.

Developed by: Matthew Day
Course Area: History

This course uses the relationship between the modern scientific enterprise and the religious notion of “salvation” as a lens through which to understand the complex relationship between religion and science. Broadly speaking, we will examine how—and, perhaps more importantly, whether—we can tell a coherent story about the dialectical relationship between scientific ambition and the quest for salvation. More specifically, we will read a sequence of important theorists which, at first glance, seems to reveal a peculiar historical arc. Although science was first conceptualized in the 17th century by Francis Bacon and others as participating in the (Christian) religious project of salvation, by the mid 20th century many intellectuals had come to see science—and the world it had constructed—as something from which we must be saved. Our collective goal will be to determine whether this apparent historical pattern is indeed real and if so, how it might be best explained.

Course Area: Ethics
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is an introduction to the study of religious ethics, a discipline devoted to inquiry into the way that ethics is conceived, contextualized, and practiced in religious traditions around the world. Through a series of class lectures and discussions, the course teaches students how various religious traditions approach specific ethical problems and reason about right and wrong behavior. Students also learn about normative ethical theories and about the complex relationship of religion and morality.

Course Area: Ethics

This course considers themes and problems in modern ethics.

Course Area: Ethics
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

The course offers an introduction to theoretical and practical issues in bioethics from the perspective of a variety of religious and secular positions.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course examines key manuscripts of the Qumran corpus and focuses on issues such as the history, beliefs, and praxis of the Jewish sectarian movement that is associated with the scrolls; the archaeology of the Qumran site; and the significance of the scrolls for understanding Second Temple Judaism.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice

This course analyzes the prophetic books of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekel, and the twelve minor prophets. The course examines the role of prophecy elsewhere in the Hebrew Bible (as in the Elijah stories) and situates the biblical prophets within the broader context of prophecy, as a religious and social phenomenon in the ancient Near East.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice

This course focuses on selected topics dealing with biblical writings in their ancient historical contexts and/or their interpretation in later period.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is an introduction to the Hindu tradition through the Ramayana, one of its most popular and celebrated sacred texts.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course studies female power in Hindu cosmology, mythology, and society. A study of Hindu goddesses, women, and female symbolism and the multifaceted relationship among them.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is a historical and thematic survey of the Buddhist tradition in Asia from its beginnings through the modern period. Topics covered include origins and history, doctrine, ethical beliefs, meditation, ritual, and monastic and popular traditions. Some attention will also be given to contemporary forms of Buddhism outside of Asia, in Europe and America. Part 1 of this course begins with some foundational concepts in Buddhism. Part II explores the history of Buddhist schools, theories, and practices in different regions of the world and over a span of 2,500 years.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course focuses on Chan, a school of Chinese Buddhism popularly known in Japanese as "Zen". The course surveys Zen both historically and thematically, from its beginnings through the modern period. Topics include Chan's origins, history, doctrine, ethical beliefs, meditation, ritual, and monastic institutions.

Developed by: Kristina Buhrman
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

Many aspects of Japanese culture or character are credited to (or blamed on) Japanese religions. This course investigates the influence of Japanese religious traditions on Japanese life, culture, and history; as well as the influence of history and politics on modem Japanese religiosity. The goal ofthe course is to address the paradox of highly influential religious traditions among a population that claims no religion. In so doing, students will address the definition of religion and of religiosity, and be prepared to talk about such definitions with relation to the specific example of Japan.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is a historical and thematic survey of the religions of Tibet and the Himalayas, including Nepal, Bhutan, and Sikkim. The course will emphasize significant facets of this region's rich cultural heritage, including religion, literature, art, and politics.

Developed by: Adam Gaiser
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course provides a historical and topical survey of Islam as a religion and civilization, focusing on the formative and classical periods of its history. The course is primarily concerned with the life and career of Muhammad, the Prophet of Islam; the scriptural sources of Islam (i.e., the Qur'an and the Sunna); the development of the Muslim community and its principal institutions (schools of thought, law, theology, cultural life, and mystical traditions).

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

REL 3367, Islam up to the Modern World examines Islam and its adherents from 1300 CE to the present, concentrating on the last two centuries of Islamic history: the period of reform, renewal and revolution in the wake of Western political and cultural domination. The course will investigate a basic question: What happened to different Muslim communities and intellectuals (specifically those in the Arab world, Iran, Turkey, and West Africa) as they responded to the challenges posed by “Westernization” and “modernization?” Moreover, it will explore the relatively new phenomenon of Islam in America. The class concludes with an investigation of various contemporary debates in the Islamic world, including Sufism, and American/Western responses to Islam and Muslims.

Developed by: Joseph Hellweg
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

A detailed understanding of African religions is a rare thing in the world today. Yet to understand contemporary Africans requires understanding their religions. Across the continent, religion is a preoccupation—economically, politically, and socially. Africans do and talk about religion in ways that challenge our most fundamental understandings of the term such that, arguably, no educated understanding of religion is possible today without grasping African approaches to this configuration of human experience. Contrary to popular expectations, African religions are no less sophisticated, complex, or salvific than any others. They encompass, reflect, and determine aspects of geography, history, culture, social organization, politics, childbirth, personhood, embodiment, gender, and sexuality as much as any other religions do. And, contrary to contemporary authors like Richard Dawkins and the late Christopher Hitchens, who see religions as the root of all ignorance, religion in Africa (as elsewhere) is a social fact that defies facile characterizations and organizes vast arrays of practical knowledge. The study of African religions can therefore offer a unique way of understanding how religions encode the cosmologies on which human beings depend to organize and inhabit their worlds.

Course Area: Ethics
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is an introduction to the major thinkers and texts in the critique of religion as it developed in the 19th and 20th centuries in the west. Beginning with Schleiermacher, the course moves on to consider the so-called "masters of suspicion"--Feuerbach, Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud. By means of a close examination of central texts, students explore the meaning of a critique of religion, the structure of religious consciousness, the place of religion with respect to other forms of culture, the problem of religion and alienation, and the possibility of a critical faith.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course surveys a variety of aspects of the history of Christianity, including significant historical events (such as the Council of Nicaea and the Protestant Reformation), as well as areas of Christian thought (such as the doctrine of God, doctrines of the soul, natural theology, faith/reason, etc.). Students will read and discuss the ideas of many important thinkers in the Christian tradition, from the authors of the New Testament and the early Church Fathers to theologians of the Medieval, Reformation, and Modern periods. Of special interest will be the situation of these thinkers in their historical and philosophical contexts, so that students will be exposed to the broader currents of Western thought in order to evaluate Christianity's relationship to these currents in their particular milieu.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course traces the historical development of American protestant thought by examining the writings of influential American protestant thinkers from different time periods, and by considering the social and intellectual forces that influenced their differing conceptions of Christan life.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is a survey of the varieties of institutional structures, beliefs, and religious practices of post-biblical Judaism in their historical contexts.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course focuses on selected topics and themes in the academic study of Buddhism. The course may explore key subjects and theories in Buddhist studies, including philosophy, history, sociology, anthropology, literature, and art history intended to introduce students to the diversity of Buddhist traditions throughout Asia, Europe, and North America and to help them develop critical skills necessary for evaluating a variety of scholarly approaches to the subject. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. May be repeated within the same semester.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice

This course considers special topics in religion.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency, Oral Communication Competency

This course is a survey of how theorists in the modern era have answered questions about the origin, essence, and function of religion, as well as an examination of the methods by which religion is studied in a scholarly environment. Many Americans and people in other democracies think of religion as a distinct domain, removed from things we call politics and economics. Scholars, in contrast, have revealed that religion reflects or projects social and psychological conflicts in ways that mobilize widespread concern. In this course, we will read and discuss classic theories by anthropologists, historians, philosophers, psychologists, religion scholars, and sociologists while exploring contemporary issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Our aim is to understand how definitions of religion, as well as the methods and theories for studying it, determine one another, making every scholar’s—and politician’s—use of “religion” anything but neutral. Our objective is to use the concept of religion as a lens through which to explore fundamental questions about being human in ways that will prepare you for a lifetime of thoughtful, critical engagement in our world.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Upper Division Writing Competency

This course studies selected topics on the Hindu tradition in 19th and 20th century India. Includes modern Hindu thinkers, reform movements, popular religion, Hindu nationalism, and pluralism. Attention also to Hindu-inspired religious movements outside India.

Developed by: Adam Gaiser
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

REL 4366, Seminar on Shi‛ite Islam, focuses on the manifold expressions of Shi‛ism from its origins to the present day. The course will examine the political divisions within the early Islamic community that led to the development of the shi‘a. After examining the earliest Shi‛a sects, the course will shift to the major juridical and theological developments within Ithna- ‘Ashari (“12er”) Shi’ism (such as the doctrine of the Imamate and the occultation and return of the 12th Imam). The course will also study the establishment and elaboration of Zaydi and Isma‘ili Shiʽism. The latter part of the course will be devoted to contemporary issues among the Shi‛ites, including the martyrdom of Husayn and the role of Hizbullah in the politics of the Middle East. There are no prerequisites for this class. However, REL 3363 Islamic Traditions, or the equivalent basic working knowledge of Islam and Islamic history is highly recommended.

Developed by: Adam Gaiser
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

REL 4393, Islam in North America, surveys in seminar format the topic of Islam in the United States, considering American articulations of Islam as well as American perceptions of Islam and Muslims. Beginning with the early 18th century, the course examines early American attitudes toward Muslims, and then moves to the experience of Islam among African-Americans. The latter third of the course is devoted to the assimilation of Muslim immigrants in the US, and how the issues of race, gender, and “trans-nationalism” impact different segments of the American Muslim community.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course consists of non-fiction writing for television and radio including public affairs, commercials, and documentaries.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Developed by: Nina Efimov
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

The course will explore representative works of major Russian authors of nineteenth and twentieth century; the development in Russia of such literary trends and movements as Romanticism, Realism, Formalism, Symbolism, Socialist Realism, Russian Underground and PostModernism. We will investigate how Russian and Soviet classics expressed in their literary images their views on freedom, religion and Orthodox church or Communist ideology and underground culture, on gentry and serfdom, minorities and role of women in Russian and Soviet societies. The course will consist of classroom discussions based on close readings and interpretations of the assigned literary works by Russian authors and – to a lesser degree – of lectures, film and individual presentations on assigned topics. Knowledge of Russian is not required.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

Russia is as diverse as it is large, and its history, arts, and politics over the years serve as testament to that fact. Taking into consideration Russia’s vast diversity and history of empire, this course approaches the study of Russian culture with a focus on how questions of race/ethnicity, class, and gender relate to Russian cultural developments from the late 18th–mid 20th centuries. These issues will be explored primarily through the literature, music, and graphic arts of the respective European aesthetic movements of the time, namely, Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Realism. Using the Western European movements as a backdrop, this course will illustrate the Russian incarnations of the movements and introduce you to Russian-specific movements as well.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course introduces students to a wide selection of Russian fairy tales, and examines their relation to human psychology and aesthetic and social values. Students will develop or enhance their understanding of the cultural influence of fairy tales in Russian literature (from Pushkin through the Soviet period) as well as in other media, especially film. The course also provides a thorough introduction to the study of the fairy tale, presenting competing theories of their origin, composition and transmission, as well as a broad range of approaches to their interpretation such as Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, Jungian analytical psychology, and structuralism. Throughout the course we will compare the Russian fairy tales we read with other European tales (by Perrault, the Brothers Grimm, Disney, etc.). We will also watch several classic Soviet animated adaptations of the tales from the 1940s to the 70s, as well as Disney’s recent live-action Russian fairy-tale film.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course consists of viewing and discussion of Russian classics and contemporary films. Credit may be applicable to the Russian major. Knowledge of Russian is not required.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This virtual course will focus on engaging students to “try on” a professional environment through an experiential learning opportunity. Experiential Learning occurs through a variety of activities including: internships, field work, service learning, projects, undergraduate research, fellowship, leadership, clinical experience, co-op, and practicum. Experiential Learning assists students in identifying and strengthening skills needed to succeed in their intended career field.

The course also will focus on how student’s experiences can put theory into practice within their intended post-baccalaureate work settings. Through goal-setting, reflection and self-evaluation, this course will facilitate professional growth.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course examines the Slavic peoples, their cultures and traditions, from prehistory to present day. The nations profiled are Ukraine, Czech Republic, Poland, Croatia, Bosnia, and Serbia. Novels and film give students a perspective from the "inside." Taught in English.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course is an exploration of the myth of the Vampire, from its origins in Slavic folklore to its appropriation by the West. It examines why the Vampire has endured not only in Eastern Europe but also in the Western imagination. Taught in English.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This one-credit course is designed as a learning opportunity for any student interested in exposure to issues regarding targeted learning assistance. This course provides training in various areas related to peer tutoring for both group and individual tutoring and is applicable across disciplines. Course content will be analyzed through the exploration of contemporary theory, group activities, readings, lectures, class discussions and online assignments. Critical inquiry, tutoring ‘best practices,’ and service learning will play important roles throughout the semester.

Developed by: Christine Andrews-Larson
Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course integrates the major themes in the FSU-Teach program: infusion of technology in representation, analysis, modeling, assessment, and contextualization of the content; field-based experiences; as well as equity in an intellectually challenging culminating experience before students start teaching. Students must complete this course prior to enrolling in the Apprentice Teaching course and the seminar course (SMT 4945 and SMT 4930) of the FSU-Teach program.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course is a systematic study of research and theories about gender, including psychological differences and similarities between the sexes. The psychological literature about women and sex roles will be examined, as well as the social processes that create gender and gender differences.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course is a critical examination of the psychocultural forces that shape and determine the unique behavior of African-Americans. Students enrolled in the course will be expected to have a moderate understanding of general psychology topics and experimental methodology. This course will examine the complex influence of sociocultural factors on psychological functioning by focusing on African Americans in the United States. Traditional and Afrocentric theories will be critically examined and contrasted.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This skills-development class covers the basic elements of interviewing and documentation utilizing the values and ethics of the social work profession. Students develop the foundational skills such as rapport-building, information-gathering, and record-keeping in order to conduct interviews with clients.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

The course provides a beginning understanding of the relationship between social welfare and social policy from a social work perspective. Students engage in policy practice to address social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services across diverse populations. Attention is given to critical analysis of the role that social work and social welfare policies and programs play in advancing human rights and social and economic justice.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course assists students in the integration of their social work courses with social work practice. The course utilizes an ecosystems perspective, focusing on the students’ ability to apply the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice to systems of all sizes. Majors only.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course enhances student understanding of human diversity and prepares students to engage in a lifetime pursuit of cultural competence. Students are encouraged to reflect upon and discuss the intricacies of their own particular dominant and/or minority social statuses and their relations to other individuals and communities. The course is designed to train students to apply theoretical frameworks to the forms and mechanisms associated with diversity, differences, and oppression. Emphasis is placed on enhancing respectful and empathic communication, and on the advancement of social and economic justice and human rights in national and global contexts.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Natural Science

This introductory course provides an overview of human communication disorders with a focus on the neuroanatomic, acoustic, biological, psychological, developmental, and linguistic principles underlying human communication disorders. It also provides an overview of the field of speech-language pathology and audiology with an emphasis on the scientific aspects of clinical assessment and rehabilitation of clients. Intended for non-majors.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course introduces students to clinical practice of speech-language pathology. Students become acquainted with the principles of assessment, application of diagnostic information, intervention planning, intervention strategies and techniques, service delivery options, and data collections. Students also gain an understanding of team membership and are introduced to the skills necessary for team building.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course is an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the speech and hearing systems. It also includes critical thinking and effective writing components.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course provides a survey and application of communication theory, including interpersonal communication, small group communication, and public speaking.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course provides majors in the College of Visual Arts, Theatre and Dance with a course designed to fulfill the university's oral communication requirement using examples drawn from a diverse range of artistic contexts.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

SPC 2608 is designed to develop public speaking skills. The textbook, lectures, and labs focus on principles of effective speech communication and their practical application. Emphasis will be placed on providing a supportive atmosphere through positive reinforcement and constructive feedback. The basic premise of this course is that public speaking is a vital skill that anyone can obtain with a commitment to understanding and practice. Students will be able to develop and deliver an effective speech with confidence and enthusiasm. Specifically, students will understand how to a) select and organize ideas; b) evaluate and choose evidence; c) support ideas clearly, vividly, and logically; d) understand and evaluate reasoning; e) analyze and adapt to an audience; and f) successfully manage apprehension about communicating in public contexts. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

This course is designed to enhance the speech making abilities of students interested in a career where these skills are essential. Students are trained in selecting and organizing ideas; conducting Internet and library research; adapting a message to a particular audience; speaking to main points; supporting ideas; and delivering an effective messaging in a presentations will be addressed in this course. This course is offered exclusively at the FSU Panama City Campus.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course approaches sport through a variety of global perspectives and cultural lenses. Students will be exposed to different national contexts, histories, leagues, and governing bodies, as well as the social, cultural, political, and economic imperatives organizing sport and its management. Global mega-events such as the Olympics and World Cup, as well as national structures such as the Barclays Premier League and New Zealand Rugby Federation, will also be highlighted. Current and future issue related to the management of sport (i.e., marketing, media, finance, and legal issues) in these contexts will be privileged.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

The course will use literary theory to critically analyze and interpret a series of popular sport-related novels. The course focuses on the role that literature in general, and sport-based books in particular, have played in promoting and challenging structures of gender, nationalism, sexuality, race, social class, and ability in the United States and Western society more generally.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course focuses on the development of advanced Spanish composition, editing, and translation skills. The course, taught in Spanish, includes specialized vocabulary, grammar review, sentence and paragraph structure study and development. Completion of drafts, editing, revisions, of topic-based compositions and translation assignments from diverse sources is required.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course includes the reading and study of some of the outstanding modern prose writers of Latin America, such as Azuela, Carpentier, Borges, Rulfo, Fuentes, Garcia Marquez, Machado de Assis, and Amado. The course is taught in English.

Developed by: Enrique Alvarez
Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

In this course we will explore the richness of cultural diversity in the Hispanic world through its cinematic production. Students will learn of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which these movies were produced in Peninsular Spain as well as in the Hispanic Caribbean and Latin America. The course will be divided into three modules, Latin American, Caribbean and Iberian, each one to include about four to six significant movies. The emphasis will be on analysis and discussion of key themes and questions of form, narrative and style. The selection of a diverse range of films from different countries will encourage students to think cross-culturally as well as to consider how divergent histories and stories have been produced, mediated and transformed in, among and within Hispanic cultures. Key themes will include regional and national identities, post/colonial subjects and subjectivities, social class, race and ethnicity, globalization, immigration and modernity, place and space, gender and sexuality, language, cultural stereotypes and historical memory. The course is taught in English.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course provides students with opportunities for detailed cultural analysis in the various geographies, historical contexts and intellectual endeavors of the Hispanic world.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

This course offers a selective study of Spanish American literary production from the Colonial Encounter to the Present. Course readings will be analyzed taking into account hegemonic structures of power including colonialism, slavery, and patriarchy. This course is taught in Spanish.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking

This course provides students with a background in applied statistical reasoning. Fundamental topics are covered including graphical and numerical description of data, understanding randomness, central tendency, correlation versus causation, line of best fit, estimation of proportions, and statistical testing.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course teaches the methods and concepts behind creating and conducting surveys and the statistical tools needed to analyze data gathered from them. Students will participate in data collection from different sources for individual- and class-designed surveys. Analysis of survey data is carried out using survey methodology software.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

Prerequisite: None, but we recommend two years of high school algebra. High school students who earn a "3" or better on the AP Statistics exam will be given credit for STA 2023. The course covers statistical applications in business, involving graphical and numerical descriptions of data, data collection, correlation and simple linear regression, elementary probability, random variables, Binomial and Normal distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for a single sample.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

Prerequisite: MAC 1105. No credit given for STA 2122 if a grade of "C-" or better is earned in STA 2171, STA 3032 or QMB 3200. The course covers Normal distributions, sampling variation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, correlation, simple and multiple regression, contingency tables and chi-square tests, non-parametric statistics.

Course Area: Quantitative and Logical Thinking
Designations: Statewide Core

This course provides an introduction to statistics emphasizing applications to biology. Topics include: descriptive statistics, elementary probability, the binomial and nomial distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, correlation and regression, contingency tables and goodness-of-fit tests as well as analysis of variance.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course will introduce the student to the SAS programming language in a lab-based format. The objective is for the student to develop programming and statistical computing skills to address data management and analysis issues using SAS. The course will also provide a survey of some of the most common data analysis tools in use today and provide decision-making strategies in selecting the appropriate methods for extracting information from data.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Developed by: Steven Ramsier
Course Area: General Education Elective (no area)
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course will cover the following topics utilizing the SAS software: ANOVA, linear modeling, logistic regression, bootstrap sampling, simulation using the data step, and some additional analytic topics.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This is a capstone course intended for statistics majors. The goal will be to enhance students’ competencies by applying advanced statistical methodology to the challenges imposed by real data and developing effective writing skills to effectively communicate project requirements and findings. Students will be exposed to several aspects of statistical practices including elements of statistical consulting, study design, setting project goals and deliverables, applying appropriate methodology, performing accurate analyses, and providing clear and concise explanations of results.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Not a general education course

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Scholarship in Practice, Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course examines the minority group status of Hispanics and Hispanic subgroups using a sociology of law lens. The course is a hands-on gathering of research-based studies and social-demographics on past and current political representation, effects of legislative and judicial decisions, and legal training on the American experience of Hispanics. The course traces the processes of minority creation for four categories of Hispanics: Mexicans, Puerto-Ricans, Cubans, and Central/South Americans, as well as their process of subordination since their entry to USA.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course explores changes in societal scale and structure associated with development of cities and urban societies, the impact on individuals and social groups of the urban context, and the ways that life in cities is influenced by social inequalities related to ethnicity, social class, and other dimensions of social organization.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course examines how gender, as an identity, interaction, institution, and inequality, influences individuals' lives and organizes society.

Developed by: Hernan Ramirez
Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course explores historical and contemporary race relations in the United States from a sociological perspective. Specifically, we will study the underlying issues that characterize the relations between and among different ethnic and racial groups in our country.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Statewide Core

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of sociology. In the course, emphasis is placed on exposure to the basic findings of empirical research studies in a wide range of areas traditionally examined by sociologists.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.

Course Area: Social Science

This course is a basic sociological approach to conditions, issues, and problems of familial organization within the context of changing institutional structures of modern society. Attention is given to such questions as: how have spouse roles changed, and why? How do changes in the organization of work affect family experience? How are family and kinship patterns affected by an aging population? etc.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course focuses on the basic sociological perspective of the social organization and forms of religious life in modern society. In the course, religious groups are studied as organizations that contribute to social stability, social conflict, and social change.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), Statewide Core

This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Oral Communication Competency

A survey course of the field of theatre, its various divisions and the School of Theatre. Preparation for independent research and communication about the profession and the school.

Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice
Designations: Scholarship in Practice

This course surveys staging practices and dramatic literature from the 19th Century to the Present. The first half of the course addresses global developments with an emphasis on formal innovation, while the second half focuses on post-WWII work from (North) America and the problem of defining the self and other according to nationality, race, and gender. Playtexts and video documentation of performance form the bulk of the source material, with occasional supplemental essays and background reading. We are interested in coming to terms with the past as well as the past's influence on the present.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course is a line by line script examination, analyzing how playwrights of various periods achieved characterization, structure, and plotting.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y)

This course is an advanced introduction to contemporary theories/practices of performance of race/gender on stage and in everyday life.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Computer Competency

This course is a capstone course in theatre. Emphasis is placed on reflecting upon skills and competencies developed in the course of study and translating those elements to future activities including work and graduate school.

Note – Not all Computer Competency courses will fulfill the Computer Competency graduation requirement for all majors. Consult with your advisor to see if this course will satisfy this requirement for your major.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course is designed for preservice teachers in the Elementary, Early Childhood, and English Education programs who will teach limited English proficiency and other linguistic minority students preK-12.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences

This course focuses on the theory and application of second-language learning and teaching strategies for limited English-proficient students in subject matter classes. The course also satisfies META requirements for all teachers of LEP students except primary language arts instructors. This course is appropriate for renewal of all certification coverage.

Course Area: Social Science
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X)

In this course, major world cities are examined in terms of their natural, social, and built environments in order to assess those factors that promote quality-of-life and sustainability. Prospects for future growth and change are considered in light of demographic, cultural, economic, and political trends.

Course Area: History
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents of the modern world from the end of the Middle Ages to 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1023. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.

Course Area: History
Designations: Cross-Cultural Studies (X), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents in the modern world since 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1030. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.

Course Area: History

This course will familiarize the student with the role of war and military history in shaping the history of Eurasia since 1200. Besides reconstructing battles and campaigns as part of conventional military history, this course employs a "War and Society" approach that examines the causes and consequences of war for social groups, institutions, political organizations, civilian populations, and the international community.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Upper Division Writing Competency

This course introduces students to the field of Women's Studies. Topics include the construction of gender and gender roles in varying social and cultural contexts. Women's roles are examined from a variety of perspectives, which may include social class, religion, culture, and sexuality. The course includes an overview of theories of feminism.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Diversity in Western Experience (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing)

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of women's roles in the development of Western culture, focusing on women's contributions to literature, theatre, art, religion, political thought, and science. Concurrently, this course examines what it meant to be female in each era of Western civilization.

Course Area: Not a general education course
Designations: Formative Experiences, Upper Division Writing Competency

Completion of an Honors in the Major Thesis will count for both Upper-Division Writing and Formative Experiences. This process normally takes two to three semesters, during which you will register for six to nine hours of 4000-level thesis credit. The Honors in the Major Program is open to all qualified students. Students do not need to be part of the University Honors Program to begin work on an Honors Thesis, but there are specific admission requirements that must be met. For more information on the program and the application process, please see http://honors.fsu.edu/honors-major.

Liberal Studies for the 21st Century is located in the University Center building C.

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